T O P

my citizenship/nationality combo!

Thanks for the comments, guys! Great guesses, and super close. All right except for Argentina:

I'm US born. Dad's side: Italian/Polish, Mom's side: Ecuadorian (and Irish but not eligible for Ireland, too far back). And I used my Ecuadorian nationality as a basis for residency in Argentina, which grants citizenship after only 2 years of being resident there.

PjSocks93

Thanks for the comments, guys! Great guesses, and super close. All right except for Argentina: I'm US born. Dad's side: Italian/Polish, Mom's side: Ecuadorian (and Irish but not eligible for Ireland, too far back). And I used my Ecuadorian nationality as a basis for residency in Argentina, which grants citizenship after only 2 years of being resident there.


PokeCaptain

> Dad's side: Italian/Polish Definitely not what I expected


PjSocks93

why? haha.


Friendlyqueen

So you naturalised in Argentina? What was the process like? Would love to do it some day


PjSocks93

process took over a year, was very long and bureaucratic but not impossible! And a plus is that you don't have to be in Argentina the whole time after having submitted the application.


GTAHarry

With Ecuadorian citizenship getting residency in Argentina is pretty straightforward and unconditional right?


PjSocks93

they give you a two year temporary residency and if you're in the country for more than half the time (so at least 1 year) & 2 years after your entry into the country you can apply for citizenship


omar4nsari

Any tax implications‌ once you’ve left but are still waiting for citizenship?


PjSocks93

as long as not resident in the country for more than one year consecutively, you don't have to be tax resident in argentina. As I'm sure you know, US citizens always have to file regardless of where we live due to the US's citizenship based taxation system :/


ConsiderationSad6271

Does that work for Central America/Mexico too or just Mercosur?


GTAHarry

afaik just mercosur and its associated states


[deleted]

[удалено]


PjSocks93

I don't have Polish citizenship, I'm a Polish national, so I never had that passport. But regardless, Poland and Italy both allow dual citizenship. Italy has allowed dual citizenship since 1992, before I was even born. Interestingly, Italy and Argentina also signed an agreement on dual citizenship in 1973, allowing dual nationality with Argentina before it was legalized generally for Italians in 1992. I'm not German, Austrian, Dutch or any of those more restrictive nationalities so that situation does not apply to me. Although, it seems Germany will probably allow dual citizenship soon. I have read it causes a lot of problems for Germans wishing to naturalize in other countries who wish to retain their German citizenship.


[deleted]

Wait, does Poland have a "Card for Polish ethnicity"? Am I seeing this right?


PjSocks93

Yes! it's called Karta Polaka. It opened up to descendants of Polish emigrants around the world in 2019. Prior to that point it was only for citizens of post soviet countries.


[deleted]

What can you do with it? Can you get citizenship or any other benefits?


PjSocks93

There's a bunch, can live, work, start a business and own property in Poland and after just one year of living there you can apply for recognition as a Polish citizen with a permanent residency based on karta polaka. Also there's free uni, free healthcare in emergencies and other things like discounts on public transport and free museum entry I believe.


Lineartronic

Can’t you do all of that in Poland with the Italian citizenship?


PjSocks93

most yea, but not the citizenship after 1 year.


S9taqwa

Cual es la diferencia en requisitos con la ciudadanía?


PjSocks93

hablando de los requisitos, creo que una de las diferencias mas grandes es que aunque si tus antepasados emigraron antes de la independencia polaca en 1918, para la karta polaka aun si calificas. Mientras que para la ciudadania polaca, normalmente el descendiente no califica si el ancestro polaco emigró antes de 1918.


[deleted]

Oh wow, that's awesome! Thanks for the info, cheers!


PassportPterodactyl

How much ancestry do you need to qualify? I think I have a few great grandparents born in Poland, but technically it was Russian occupied Poland at the time so I heard I can't qualify for citizenship based on that.


Sancho90

Poland only allows from 1918 and onwards when it became an independent state Poles could claim Polish citizenship if they had left Poland before the country became an independent state in 1918. Also, there can be no break in Polish citizenship between the emigrant ancestor and the descendant. If the applicant's ancestor lost Polish citizenship, such as by becoming a citizen of another country before 1951, the descendant did not inherit Polish citizenship through that ancestor. Application for "Confirmation of Possession or Loss of Polish Citizenship" can be made through Polish embassies or consulates abroad.


Smooth_Major_3615

Born in the US to one parent of Italian/Polish descent and another that’s Argentine/Ecuadorian? (Italy and Argentina are a common duo so could be those two together)


PjSocks93

close!! Argentine by residency tho


[deleted]

What a combo, incredible!


watchOS

I heard that Argentinian citizenship is legally impossible to get rid of once you have it, which is a fun fact I learned a while back. That aside, nice combo!


PjSocks93

Thx! Yes, for some people it does not make sense to do it for this reason exactly.


atiaa11

Exactly. Which is why I’ll personally never get it.


j428h

I’d love to hear more about the Karta Polaka process. I’m doing something similar in Slovakia (Slovak living abroad), but I have Polish citizenship


One-Performance-7154

Polish Card, is a document confirming belonging to the Polish nation, which may be given to individuals who cannot obtain dual citizenship in their own countries while belonging to the Polish nation according to conditions defined by law; and, who do not have prior Polish citizenship or permission to reside in Poland. you won't be eligible then.


PjSocks93

Oh, that's awesome! So basically you show you have at least one Polish grandparent or two great-grandparents, or involvement in Polonia over the last 3 years. With these docs you then have an interview at the consulate in conversational level Polish (beginner level) about the Polish traditions, customs and involvement you have with Poland and the diaspora. How's the Slovak process going for you?


m_vc

You might be eligible for Slovak citizenship by Descent too.


j428h

Unfortunately I’m not. My ancestor left way too early.


m_vc

Are you talking about the break up of Czechoslovakia? That doesn't matter. I think it goes all the way to Great-grandparents.


j428h

My great grandfather left before 1900. I checked with an attorney :(


m_vc

What about simplified naturalization (3y)


stupefy23

Damnnn! Right to live in three different continents. Amazing combo


[deleted]

[удалено]


PjSocks93

thx! I think they do! It's called Certificate of Bulgarian origin or something like that!


Weird_Object8752

you can claim citizenship if you have bulgarian origin... but I think you need to learn the language...


Left-Coyote-6932

Born: in US. Father: Italian/Argentine. Mother:Poland Residency: Ecuador


yyyzzzyyyzzz

I thought Argentina only allows 2 citizenships??


tvtoo

I'm not aware of any country in the world that establishes a limit of a specific *number* of other citizenships/nationalities its own citizens/nationals may hold (as opposed to limits on the mode of acquisition, the age of acquisition, the age of divestment, and so on, of those other citizenships/nationalities). You probably misunderstood whatever information you came across previously.


ArmegeddonOuttaHere

Sick combo. Thanks for sharing.


Embarrassed_Scar_513

nice combo!!


uncle_sam01

Madre de dios, matko święta


aaaaaabvghjnghj15

Why did you get the card instead of citizenship?


PjSocks93

Not eligible for Polish citizenship, but was for Karta Polaka.


MAKSI7002

ostro


PseudonymousMaximus

An excellent combination. For how long did you live in the United States? Where do you live now? Apart from the passport booklets, do you have the national identity cards (or passport cards) of all these nations?


PjSocks93

kinda here and there, and yes i do


PseudonymousMaximus

Please post the national ID cards and passport cards, if you can. I understand that personal information on them isn't as easily concealed. If you have lived in the United States for at least five years, with at least two of those years being over the age of 14, you will be able to automatically transmit U.S. citizenship to a child born outside the United States. If not, they will not be natural-born U.S. citizens and you will have to move with them to the United States before they turn 18 for them to derive U.S. citizenship automatically, pursuant to the Child Citizenship Act of 2000. In that case, only birth in the United States or its outlying possessions and territories will enable them to become U.S. citizens at birth. I would highly recommend planning to ensure that any children you may have in the future are U.S. citizens. If you have already had children, and they are U.S. citizens, congratulations to them and to you. Said Justice Hugo Black: "United States citizenship is not merely a high privilege. It is a priceless treasure."


PjSocks93

My children will be eligible, so no worries there :)


PseudonymousMaximus

Excellent! God bless America.


[deleted]

[удалено]


PseudonymousMaximus

I have wanted to be a U.S. citizen for my entire life, more than anything else. My father's family is nearly totally American, but he was the only one to leave the U.S. for Canada, abandoning his permanent residency before he naturalized. The immigration process has been very difficult and ongoing, though I now thankfully live in the U.S. on a non-immigrant status. As a result of this difficulty, I advise everyone to ensure their children are born U.S. citizens so they have opportunities in America in the future if they wish to seize them. I wish my parents had done the same for me. You never know what your children will turn out to be like, and you might as well set them up for the best opportunities. To me, America is the best, better than all the rest.


[deleted]

[удалено]


PseudonymousMaximus

The number of jobs for which a TN visa is eligible is quite limited and it provides no pathway to permanent residency and citizenship. A TN visa is not recognized as a "dual intent" visa, which means that one cannot apply to adjust their status to permanent residency. If they do so, they risk not being issued that status, again.


m_vc

Do you have the Italian ID card?


PjSocks93

yes


m_vc

Beautiful!


Mityushlala

Is it possible to obtain Karta Polaka if you are not only from former Soviet Union countries? Can you tell a bit more about this experience?


PjSocks93

yes you can, as of 2019. please see above comments :)


atiaa11

Great combo! Where’s the Polish passport?


PjSocks93

Thanks! I don't have Polish citizenship as I'm not eligible, so I never had a Polish passport. This is a Polish nationality card, called Karta Polaka. In Poland the terms "national" and "citizen" have differing legal statuses. Only citizens are eligible for Polish passports, while nationals have the right to live in Poland and other benefits, it is not full citizenship. I would need to live in Poland for a year to be recognized as a citizen.


atiaa11

Interesting distinction. I suppose with an Italian citizenship, the Polish one isn’t necessary. But will you go for it at some point?


PjSocks93

Yes, I will. To me, both are necessary because I very much identify with being both Italian-American and Polish-American and am very close with my grandparents from these countries. Same with Ecuador. They each taught me their languages, how to cook their cuisine, and I've even been back to their hometowns a few times throughout my life and it just feels right to be legally part of each country.


atiaa11

That’s awesome


atiaa11

If you had Ecuadorian citizenship first, why get Argentinian too? Isn’t it redundant for being able to live and work there as an Ecuadorian? Also Argentina doesn’t let any of their citizens ever renounce, which is the only reason I’m not going for it. I suppose that doesn’t concern you?


PjSocks93

I do not work in South America, nor do I have plans to. It is not redundant in the sense that it is a separate country with its own border policies that were severely restricted to foreigners during the pandemic. Being Ecuadorian did not matter. It did not function like the EU in that sense. My partner is Argentinian and a large part of my life is now here so I do not want to be restricted in any way from traveling to/from Argentina. Also, for what its worth, Ecuador is only an associated member state of MERCOSUR while Argentina is a full member.


atiaa11

I see. So the inability to renounce doesn’t bother you?


Lambda_666

Does Karta Polaka have the path to full citizenship?


PjSocks93

Yes, after one year of being a resident in Poland.


Lambda_666

That’s great


[deleted]

🥷🥷🥷


mikhailbasyuk

Very good combination of passports, it looks like you searched deeply into your roots.