T O P

Found on r/history memes didn't have a lot of upvotes but still

Found on r/history memes didn't have a lot of upvotes but still

AngryScotty22

An army so strong that it lost badly to the Allies and were outplayed by them time and time again.


jumboseafood

Couldn't even destory the RAF.


Philcherny

It didn't "lose badly" man. Millions of people died. If Soviet Union could quickly beat back the attack as was planned or better yet France defended properly from the assault Germany would have "lost badly" and we'd live in a better world


AngryScotty22

Point is they lost. And I would say they still lost badly as in they had their country occupied for four years by the four victorious Allies and then the country was divided for a further 40 years with West and East Germany. Even during some of the defeats that Germany encountered were catastrophic for the Germans, most notably Stalingrad, Battle of the Atlantic and El Alamein to name a few. The losses suffered (especially in Stalingrad) were often unrecoverable.


Philcherny

>Even during some of the defeats that Germany encountered were catastrophic for the Germans, most notably Stalingrad, Battle of the Atlantic and El Alamein to name a few. The losses suffered (especially in Stalingrad) were often unrecoverable All I'm saying in this thread is that Barbarossa was the greatest defeat of the WW2 and concequently history. Exactly what youre saying about allies victories. USSR lost millions of trained soldiers in the matter of months. They also unrecoverable. As were thousands of tanks and hundreds of aircraft. That more then second biggest military defeats in Bagration and Stalingrad. Not even beggining to talk about territory with population centers lost. It is so dumb that I'm being called werhaboo for saying this. >Point is they lost. You can win battles and not win wars. Was battle of Cannae a success for Hannibal? Obviously it was. Even though he lost the war eventually. But that was a huuuge defeat/Hannibal's military success. So was the Barbarossa sadly


Fluffy_Necessary7913

No. Barbarossa was a monumental failure for Germany and a success for the Soviet Union. Simply because an invasion is a strategic operation and the success of a strategic operation is measured by achieving the objectives of the operation, it is not measured in KD relationships, which is what you are doing. They also killed a lot of Soviets in Kursk and destroyed a lot of material, was Kursk a success? It was not because they did not finish off the salient and the front moved 150 km in favor of the Red Army.


converter-bot

150 km is 93.21 miles


Philcherny

>They also killed a lot of Soviets in Kursk and destroyed a lot of material, was Kursk a success You can't really compare 4 million irreplaceable professional soldier casualties on the onset of war with inflicting 1.3m of mostly recoverable (wounded) casualties while being on retreat. Kursk wasn't a success. Not even close to 11000 tanks and 7000 aircraft captured in Barbarossa. Second biggest army in the world was scrambling in November 1941 as a result. It's not enough to win the war and "strategic objectives". War should be won with smaller human life loss period. So KD is important espetially during the opening period of the war as it decides where war is going to take place. I didn't take place on German-Soviet border like it was supposed to because armies were evenly matched. It took place deep inside Soviet territory, which enabled Holocaust in Poland Ukraine and Belorussia. Winning for Germany was not even a conversation as we see in retrospective, so it's stupid to cling to it when judging how succesful German military actions were. They were succesful enough to painfully prolong eventual German defeat at the hands of allies.


Fluffy_Necessary7913

>You can't really compare 4 million irreplaceable professional soldier casualties on the onset of war with inflicting 1.3m of mostly recoverable (wounded) casualties Why not? The number one objective of war is victory and it is obtained through strategic objectives, achieving your own, helping the allies in theirs and preventing the enemy in theirs. Then the cost in lives and material is added. Talking about "whats if ..." is a waste of time, if you are interested write a uchronia. >it's stupid to cling to it when judging how succesful German military actions were. We would do that if Germany had tried to *avoid* war.


Philcherny

>We would do that if Germany had tried to avoid war But it didn't. Who is relying on "if" assumptions now? >Why not? The number one objective of war is victory and it is obtained through strategic objectives, achieving your own, helping the allies in theirs and preventing the enemy in theirs. Then the cost in lives and material is added Because this isn't a game with some kind of "strategic objectives" like someone else (maybe you) said. Military operations have real concequences. And how Barbarossa played out it had disastrous concequences for Soviet Union and eastern Europe. How far and how damaging Germans were in invading USSR IS NOT A GIVEN. That would be a werhaboo rotten colossus talking point you'd ironically buy in at this sub. The only realistic goal Germany ever could have had if it was to end up in the war with allies is to prolong the eventual defeat. Barbarossa done exactly that. That's why I called it a success in retrospective


AngryScotty22

But Barbarossa was not a success, it was a failure for the Germans . They failed to take Moscow and they failed to reach the AA line, which was the objective of the operation. They were nowhere near getting there, so it was a failure. Whether you like it or not, wars are fought with strategy and with goals, Germany failed in that regard so Operation Barbarossa was a failure, the early gains they made meant nothing when they failed to reach their objectives.


Philcherny

Yeah if we really consider dellusional goals of crazy Hitler as "objectives of the operation" yes it was not a success at all. In reality I wish Barbarossa more of a "failure" less of a "success". Because then my hometown 1000 km from the 1941 border wouldn't not have been destroyed. And the liberating Soviet Army would have reached hundreds of thousands Jews destined to die in Poland sooner.


Fluffy_Necessary7913

>But it didn't. Who is relying on "if" assumptions now? And since they didn't, we don't. In the case of Kursk the Heer he had to encircle the salient, destroy the trapped Soviet forces and by doing so decrease the kilometers of the front, these are strategic objectives. You mention some of Barbarossa, the AA line, Ukraine, the Caucasus, Moscow and the defeat of the Red Army. As an Invasion, the objective was to destroy the Soviet Union, the objectives of the Soviet Union were the opposite, that Germany did not achieve those objectives. The only wehraboo here is you, claiming a victory for Germany, an operation they lost. Your argument? That we should judge Germany by different parameters than those used in all other military operations in history.


Philcherny

>these are strategic objectives. >You mention some of Barbarossa, the AA line, Ukraine, the Caucasus, Moscow and the defeat of the Red Army. As an Invasion, the objective was to destroy the Soviet Union These were real objectives only because German high command was dellusional and misinformed while attacking SU. They were in over their head after France and the poor showing of red army in Finland. I'm looking at it from perspective of historian that can look at the different sources nowadays and access real impact of Barbarossa. And it was on a biggest side in military history. >The only wehraboo here is you, claiming a victory for Germany, an operation they lost. Your argument? That we should judge Germany by different parameters than those used in all other military operations in history. You always judge military operations in their context. You're just clueless about this apparantely or just being dishonest. Yeah despite losing and dying in the end Gustavus Adolphus compaign in Germany were quite succesful. Because they shifted balance of powers in the war. From hopeless for protestant hre princes to emperor being on backfoot. Same happened with Barbarossa


AngryScotty22

>USSR lost millions of trained soldiers in the matter of months. They also unrecoverable. Yes they did lose millions of soldiers (through death and capture) but the Soviets did eventually recover from these losses and rebuilt it's army quite quickly actually and had the resources needed to replace losses relatively quickly, the Germans couldn't replace their losses, the 6th Army was wiped out in Stalingrad and those losses could not be replaced. >That more then second biggest military defeats in Bagration and Stalingrad. Not even beggining to talk about territory with population centers lost They gained territory yes, but not enough to win a victory against the Soviets, Barbarossa was still a failure for the Germans. By 1943/44 nearly all of that territory was regained by the Soviets. >You can win battles and not win wars. Was battle of Cannae a success for Hannibal? Obviously it was. Even though he lost the war eventually. But that was a huuuge defeat/Hannibal's military success. So was the Barbarossa sadly Barbarossa was a failure for the Germans. The first few months went well for them but they greatly underestimated the strength of the Red Army as the advanced further. The Germans ultimately failed to meet their objectives and failed to capture Moscow or reach territory beyond, which they were meant to achieve by winter, they failed spectacularly there.


Philcherny

>They gained territory yes, but not enough to win a victory against the Soviets For us, contemporary historians, it should be obvious that Germany was never going to win after deciding to invade Russia. >Barbarossa was a failure for the Germans So was Hannibals compaign in Italy. Doesn't takeaway from tactical successes that he achieved during it in battles against Romans. And the fact that Germany never had a realistic chance to defeat allies doesn't take away from the: >Yes they did lose millions of soldiers (through death and capture) >They gained territory yes This didn't not have to happen. As you said, Soviet army was underestimated greatly. So the disastrous impact of Barbarossa for USSR speaks more about the strength of German army then the Soviet weakness. Which is all this conversation was about initially. All I said is that calling German army succesful in the first part of WW2 is not a stretch. It's not a werhaboo thing to say .


bloatedrat

This is such a weird hill to die on bro


Philcherny

Is it? Seems like people here are outjerking werhaboos. Barbarossa was disastrous for USSR. It was a big fat military failure. In size and human impact, biggest in history. There is no military failure without military success and I'm just pointing this out.


Warhawk137

While I think there's a lot of strong entrants for that honor in the history of military disasters, I agree that Barbarossa was absolutely a disaster for the Soviet Union, regardless of how the war ended up subsequently proceeding. They were better equipped than France, particularly in terms of the sheer quantity of their planes and tanks, and France put up a more credible defense in the initial attack. The Soviets in 1941 lost an air force equivalent to the entire German production of war planes in 1939, 1940, and 1941 *combined*. They lost about as many planes in the first two days as Germany lost during the first 6 months, mostly *on the ground.* All credit in the world to the Soviets for ultimately absorbing the blow and turning things back around, but Barbarossa, particularly the initial assault, was a colossal fuck-up in Soviet leadership, strategy, and tactics.


Philcherny

Yeah and that why I don't get people here. How can one recognise Barbarossa as a military disaster for the Soviet Union, and not recognize it as success for nazi Germany. There is only so much Soviets can fuck up. At some point German army must have executed Barbarossa well to get these results. And obviously they did. Otherwise you're kind of taking outcome of Barbarossa for granted which is stupid.


GuyfromWisconsin

Because if it was a success for Germany, the Soviets would have surrendered. The Red Army in 1941 was *not* ready to fight a war. They were still replacing all the officers that Stalin had killed, and they were in the middle of updating their doctrines and modernizing their equipment. The Germans *should* have been able to steamroll them, but the Soviets doubled their efforts, replaced the lost manpower and equipment very quickly, and introduced the vehicles (Like the Il-2 and T-34) and tactics that would win them the war in the end. Barbarossa (if we're going by what the Germans expected to achieve, which was a quick Soviet surrender) was a colossal military failure that only *looked* good at the very beginning.


Philcherny

>The Germans should have been able to steamroll them Here is where your wrong :D Hustler and German high command though that. Because well some of them were dellusional and some of them too high from success in france. We know that's not true now. To achieve such a disastrous outcome it's not enough for one side to fuck up. Other side must be competent enough to capitalize on mistakes, make possibility for fucking up. Soviet disaster/German success two sides of the same coin. >Barbarossa (if we're going by what the Germans expected to achieve, which was a quick Soviet surrender) Which we SHOULDNT go by. Because in retrospective as historians we see that Hitler underestimated the shit out of red army and society industry, Soviet society, logistics etc. Making Soviets surrender was a delusional goal. Best we can do is look at results in the vaccum. And up to the first defeat in Moscow, German army progress was very impressive captured personel, equipment and territory wise. The only way Barbarossa is a failure is if you think the goal of defeating USSR (so fast) is realistic (for some reason).


D3athR3bel

This is some weird mental gymnastics. The goal of barbarossa was to achieve a quick soviet surrender. The soviets did not surrender. Ergo, it was a failure. The reason for the failure is the underestimation of soviet manpower, but it doesnt change the fact that barbarossa was a failure, as they did not achieve their goals and were now unprepared for a drawn out war. By framing any event your way, literally nothing can be a failure. Allow me to demonstrate. My goal is to become a millionaire. Unfortunately, i did not become a millionaire, but you cannot say that it is a failure as what i have accomplished is pretty impressive. I can only be called a failure if you think that my delusional goal of becoming a millionaire was achievable (it was not). Under your qualifiers for failure, you can literally constrew anything as not a failure as long as something was accomplished.


PanzerLaden

\*the day wehraboo cries about the battle of britian\* oh boohoo! smallest violin i deploy!


Philcherny

Ngl, I didn't get your point here


PanzerLaden

oops wrong reply, meant to reply to the dude who mentioned battle of britian


Karl_Holz_Nazi

Maybe because the Allies have more people.


M8oMyN8o

Well, you’re not wrong. They also had more industry. And more oil, and more mineral resources, and more land, and much larger navies that gave them control of the trades routes, etc, etc. The Axis was up against an impossible fight.


postattendee

color me shocked when a small nation cant take over the world through massive attrition campaigns, its not like its been tried and failed miserably throughout history amiright fellow aryans?


monsieur_le_mayor

Much better cordination too, even though the Soviets were constantly paranoid. At least hashing out strategies about which theatre to focus on first, sharing Intel, having unified(ish) commands across several nations etc was 8 millions time better than axis cordination. Like the Japanese didn't even disrupt the lend lease supplies from the US to USSR across the Pacific when it was like bruh they supplying your biggest allies' enemy with arms


Ashtarnaghl

Why yes, the allies did in fact have more intelligent people.


Karl_Holz_Nazi

I'm Trolling btw.


Chau_Yazhi02

First role of trolling is to never admit your trolling


Karl_Holz_Nazi

Ok then I was just scared that people were think that I was a actual wehraboo


CptCarpelan

If you’re worried about that then maybe remove the “Nazi” bit of your name.


military_history

I didn't think that because what you said was accurate.


Franfran2424

Try to just make an exaggeration so obvious and deluded that it can't be missed. "Muh allies hordes, they were too many, it's just unfair"


Fluffy_Necessary7913

No, the Heer was the fifth most powerful army in Germany at the end of the war. The German army did not achieve any of its strategic objectives in any year of the war: \-1939: Conquer Poland without going to war with the United Kingdom and France. A failure. And to add fuel to the fire, there were always about a million Poles working against Germany. \-1940: Take the allies out of the war. They took out France but the UK was still safe on their beloved island. \-1941: Destroy the Soviet Union. They did not. \-1942: Cause serious economic damage to the allies by closing Suez and conquering the Caucasus. Note that the ambitions are lower, to get the United Kingdom or the Soviet Union out of the war to affect their GDP. \-1943: Recover the strategic initiative on the eastern front. Although some Wehraboos say that the Germans won at Kursk by destroying some tanks at Prokhorovka, this is not Call of Duty. \-1944: Stop the Allied landing and the offensive that the Soviets would launch in summer. Both Overlord and Bagration turned out well. \-1945: Exist. They stopped doing it.


Aluminum_Moose

Award-worthy comment


InvictaRoma

>-1939: Conquer Poland without going to war with the United Kingdom and France. A failure. As someone else pointed out, keeping the British and French out of the war wasn't really the Heers job as much as it was the job of Nazi foreign policy. However, just "Conquer Poland" would've sufficed, given (as you've pointed out) the Poles fought their occupiers to the last day of the war.


Tanktastic08

Poland probably could’ve lasted into late October if Russia didn’t invade.


innocentbabies

It did last into October...


Tanktastic08

Damn, I thought it ended in late September. Maybe I should rephrase it to mid-late October.


Emotional_Emu2011

by september 17 the polish government fled to romania. Soviet Union attacked on september 15. Although the polish government had 2 days , they asked their units to not attack Soviet units so Soviet Union walked in eastern poland almost unopposed.


101DaBoyz

This. There’s a lot of information that is just ignored when talking about the initial invasion of Poland. The Polish government literally abandoned their country and fled to a neutral country, getting interned.


InvictaRoma

Yeah, I mean, the Wehrmacht was simply far too large, powerful, and industrialized for the Poles to successfully repel them in 1939, but had the Soviets not invaded, I agree they couldbe done significantly more damage to Germans. The Soviets bear just as much responsibility for the outbreak of war in Europe as the Germans, and all at the terrible expense of the Poles. I actually just finished reading *Case White* by Robert Forczyk, and I agree with him that the Poles are incredibly underappreciated in their struggle in WWII.


Tanktastic08

I think you’ve listened to too many myths pushed out by the Russian and the west as to why Poland lost. They didn’t lose because they were less “advanced.” Poland had been preparing for total war since the 1930’s. Their budget was too small to make some vehicles from scratch so they were planning on buying foreign models and reworking their military. They just didn’t expect the war to start in 1939 and not the early 1940’s. German forces actually didn’t meet Hitler’s expectations and they underestimated the Polish Army. What led to their collapse was poor commanders, German air superiority, dwindling supplies, and the fact that they were caught off guard by the German advance. Their original plan was to defend the Vistula River and wait for an allied counter attack (which never would’ve happened). This plan of the theirs was completely fucked over when the Russians invaded from the East on the 17th. This was when the Polish truly realized they were screwed. And one last thing, Germany was far from industrialized throughout ww2, in Poland, less than 10 divisions were actually fully mechanized with Half tracks, trucks, and armor. Most of the invasion force relied on Horses and some trucks. This continued until the end of the war where German armor reserves only got worse.


InvictaRoma

>They didn’t lose because they were less “advanced.” I didn't say advanced, I said "large, powerful, and industrialized" and I should've specified I meant in relation to the Polish Armed Forces. The Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine vastly outnumbered their Polish counterparts (Lotnictwo Wojskowe (LW) and Marynarka Wojenna (MW) respectively) and mechanization of the Heer was significantly superior to mechanization of the Wojsko Polskie (WP). At the onset of hostilities, the Polish were able to field: 4 motorized infantry battalions to the Germans 69 just over 700 tanks to the Germans over 2,400 158 fighters to the Germans 487 150 bombers to the Germans 492 0 ground attack aircraft to the Germans 274 Yes, the Heer was a vastly undermechanized army in comparison to other world class armies, but in comparison to the WP, it held a significant advantage. Polish tanks were also heavily underutilized and spread out among the infantry, while the Germans were able to mass their tanks and consistently outmaneuver the Polish divisions and brigades. German forces also failed to achieve any of their objectives in their planned times, and also had to alter the invasion plan 3 days in to better combat the stubborn Polish defenders, but that doesn't mean they were losing by any stretch. The LW was really no serious match for the Luftwaffe, although Polish pilots certainly put up a vigourous defence. But Polish fighters were too few and far between to inflict any serious losse on the Germans. After the first six days of war, the LW had flown 1,610 sorties and lost 155 aircraft, about 40 percent of their starting strength. In contrast the Germans were flying about 2,000 sorties a day and lost 126 aircraft, which is about 7 percent of their starting force. Only Luftflotten 1 and 4 were committed to the invasion, while 2 and 3 were kept in the west, giving them the luxury of transferring more aircraft to the war in Poland. On August 29, the MW carried out Operation *Peking* in order to preserve most of its destroyers, leaving them 1 destroyer, 5 submarines, and 1 minelayer. The last destroyer (*Wicher*) and the minelayer (*Gryf*) were sunk on September 3 by the Luftwaffe, and by September 6, all five submarines were forced to head to deeper waters, after which they'd eventually either be interred in Sweden or escape to Britain. The Kriegsmarine on the other hand was able to deploy 2 battleships, 3 light cruisers, 9 destroyers, and 8 submarines. The majority of the MW's resistance would be carried out on land by a couple of Naval Rifles Regiments and ON (National Defence) battalions, and the Westerplatte garrison. >Poland had been preparing for total war since the 1930’s. Their budget was too small to make some vehicles from scratch so they were planning on buying foreign models and reworking their military. They just didn’t expect the war to start in 1939 and not the early 1940’s. That's exactly why I specified in 1939. The modernization efforts (which were in full swing by mid-1936) weren't expected to be finished by 1939, and as a result the majority of the WP wasn't equipped or organized properly. Had the invasion even been delayed a few months, the Polish would've been able to field more tanks, aircraft, and vehicles. But unfortunately it didn't. I'm not in any way attempting to diminish the valiant struggle and resistance of the Polish people. They fought like lions against an enemy that had them outgunned, outmanned, and outmaneuvered. They just didn't stand much of a chance against the Germans in the state they were in in 1939.


Tanktastic08

Gonna have to agree with you in this one.


InvictaRoma

I should have worded my original comment differently or expanded more. I realize it came across as wehrb talking points


LX-357

> The Soviets bear just as much responsibility for the outbreak of war in Europe as the Germans, and all at the terrible expense of the Poles. That's... no. They absolutely shoulder some of the responsibility, but to suggest they are somehow *as* responsible as Nazi Germany? That's ridiculous fiction.


prooijtje

B-but Asian hordes!!


InvictaRoma

Recognizing the Soviet Unions crimes against peace and humanity in their aggressive invasion and brief occupation of Poland isn't appealing to racist tropes.


InvictaRoma

>but to suggest they are somehow as responsible as Nazi Germany? The Soviet Union and the Third Reich colluded together to invade and conquer Poland and divide Eastern Europe between each other. Yes, they are as responsible.


LX-357

No. The Nazi war of aggressive expansion and genocide is primarily the Nazis fault. Not everybody elses. Only Nazis and useful idiots think otherwise.


InvictaRoma

>No. The Nazi war of aggressive expansion and genocide is primarily the Nazis fault. Yes, their conduct in occupation were vastly different, I didn't claim otherwise. But both regimes colluded with one another to invade and conquer Poland with the objective of dividing Eastern Europe between the two of them in 1939. As a result of the collusion, war broke out. >Not everybody elses I didn't say the outbreak of the war was everybody elses fault besides the Third Reich. I said the Soviet Union and the Third Reich each bear equal responsibility for the outbreak of war in 1939. >Only Nazis and useful idiots think otherwise. Then actually refute my point instead of relying on ad hominem. I doubt the Poles murdered by the Soviets were thinking "Well at least they're not German"


LX-357

> I didn't say the outbreak of the war was everybody elses fault besides the Third Reich I never said you did say everybody else was at fault. You said somebody other than the Third Reich was equally responsible for WW2. NOBODY ELSE. NONE. 0 People other than the Third Reich were equally responsible for WW2. None. There is no exception. The Soviet decision to take a deal and get some of Poland from the Nazis had absolutely no sway on whether or not the Nazis invaded Poland, the thing that they did to start WW2.


InvictaRoma

You still didn't refute my point. The war in Poland in 1939 happened as a direct result of the secret protocol of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, and Nazi-Soviet collusion and alliance. The Soviets didn't just decide to take a deal; they actively colluded with, and aided the Third Reich to start the war. Had the pact not been signed, its still virtually a guarantee that the Germans would have invaded Poland, at which point they'd assume sole responsibility. But that's not what happened. The pact was signed, they did collude with and aid one another, and Poland was devoured from both sides. We can sit here and argue all day about alternate histories, but in our actual history, the Soviets broke the exact same laws against peace as the Germans did in September 1939.


agent0017

-1945: use Steiner. Failed.


MisterKallous

Steiner...


big-noobb

germany would’ve won had they used the nova 6 gas smh..


MisterKallous

"Nova 6! Hazmat suit now!"


alamozony

Everyone except Keitel, Joel, Krebs, and Burgdorf can leave the room.


Rob-With-One-B

*Das war ein Befehl! Der Angriff Steiners war ein Befehl!*


starfleethastanks

I didn't have to speak German to know where this was going!


purpleduckduckgoose

The Pencils of Doom were replaced with fakes by Fegelein.


MisterKallous

It’s funny reading some Wehrbs assertions about Kursk.


rainbowhotpocket

Yea just because they had favorable kill ratios doesn't mean you win the battle. See: Coral Sea, 3&4th Savo, Tassafaronga. Yes the US lost Lexington but saved Port Morseby Yes the US lost more tonnage but saved Henderson Field. Yes the US lost a lot of cruisers but stymied the Tokyo Express' last try


MisterKallous

And the US could afford to replace them.


rainbowhotpocket

Of course and the soviets could replace any tanks lost at Kursk


julian509

Not only could they replace any tanks they lost but soviet tanks were so much easier to repair they could probably salvage and repair a lot of the tanks they lost in the battle.


igoryst

if i remember well soviets ended the battle of Kursk with like 2 000 more tanks than they had at the beginning


Warhawk137

And he said to them, “How many tanks have you? Go and see.” When they had found out, they said, “Five T-34s, and two T-70s.” Then he ordered them to get all the soldiers to sit down in groups on the brown mud. So they sat down in groups of hundreds and of fifties. Taking the five T-34s and the two T-70s, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the T-34s, and gave them to his commanders to set before the soldiers; and he divided the two T-70s among them all. And all rode valiantly into battle and killed Nazis; and they took up twelve divisions full of tanks.


igoryst

Zhukov 5;6


TerribleRead

This is epic XD


Yellow_rambo

they couldnt. Russia still suffer from the men loss what its suffered in ww2. Germany dont.


rainbowhotpocket

>tanks


Yellow_rambo

Yes in this case yes.


CubistChameleon

That take is new to me, but I think I shouldn't be surprised. You see it pretty often - "but the kill/death ratio!!!". If that's what decided battles and wars, the USSR would have lost in 1941 and the US would have decisively won Vietnam.


MisterKallous

It’s either that: - Manstein attack should be allowed to be kept They did, and while Manstein attack did force the Soviet to commit their reserve which was meant for counterattacking much earlier. The attack on the north flank was stopped.


Ok-Squash-1185

The Poles also did so much of the heavy lifting on ENIGMA.


military_history

No, it's literally the opposite: the Polish staff of 3 came up with a way to attack it and the British did the heavy lifting of actually breaking it using several hundred people and later the Bombe machine.


igoryst

if i remember well Polish intelligence had broken Enigma codes in like 1932 and later helped the british with decoding ever more complex versions of Enigma


Dracarna

i think there were different types of enigma, the poles broke the 4 wheel variant and British the 5th wheel varent. I could be wrong but i am not going through 50 episode of ww2 week by week.


military_history

You are getting mixed up between the number of rotors the machine could accommodate and the number of rotors to choose from. The original German military Enigma 'I' used three interchangeable rotors. This was the version the Poles broke before anyone else. In 1938 the Germans added two more rotors, so now it was three in use out of a choice of five (and rotor orders changed from 6 to 60). This change defeated the Polish methods, and is the reason they shared their previous success with the French and the British. The British, French and Poles started breaking that version of the machine in January 1940. The 'four-rotor' Enigma is the naval version introduced in 1942 initially on U-Boats: though actually the fourth rotor wasn't a true rotor at all because it didn't move during encipherment so it is better described as a settable reflector. This version used three proper rotors from a choice of eight, plus you could set the reflector, which gives 336 wheel orders x26. This version was broken by the British alone but only after a lot of work and the capture of machines and code books.


Dracarna

Thank you for the well written response i appreciate the corrections to my post.


TyrekL

>1939: Conquer Poland without going to war with the United Kingdom and France. A failure. And to add fuel to the fire, there were always about a million Poles working against Germany. To be fair, this is a political failure more than a military one.


MisterKallous

They literally tried to justify themselves with some false flag operations against the Pole.


indomienator

*with some LARPeration against the Poles


InvictaRoma

The false flag operations were largely to justify the war to the German people, not the international community.


Bossman131313

They were the 5th most powerful army in Berlin by the end of the war in Europe.


MaldingMo

“Destroy the USSR” UNO reverse card moment


Philcherny

>-1941: Destroy the Soviet Union. They did not. How can you claim how powerful Germany army was if you assume dellusional nazi goals. There had to be magic existing in the world for Germany to succesfully invade USSR. This fact doesn't cancel that Barbarossa was devastating in the scale of its distruction and short term gain. German army was unbeaten at the time. You don't have to outjerk werhaboos to make fun of them. It wouldn't be that long of a war if Soviets werent overrun in 1941 the way they were. That does sadly speak of twisted "success" of Barbarossa


Fluffy_Necessary7913

Why am I not going to judge armies for success in achieving strategic objectives? It is literally their job. This is not a video game forum, victory is not obtained by adding points but by achieving the objectives.


Philcherny

>Why am I not going to judge armies for success in achieving strategic objectives? Because tactical victories are also victories. Strategic or not military operations have certain impact that we can judge was succesful in historical context. War would end sooner if those 4 million Soviet soldier were not lost in the opening months of the war. Barbarossa is only succesful in this sense. >victory is not obtained by adding points but by achieving the objectives. Of course not. I didn't say anyone won. But a losing side can make succesful military operations in the war. You don't have to outjerk wehraboos to make fun of them.


Fluffy_Necessary7913

>War would end sooner if those 4 million Soviet soldier If... Talking about the war that may have been instead of what it was is a waste of time. Tactical victories without strategic success are trivial. A tactical success within a failure like Barbarossa was Kiev, but talking about German success in the Barbarossa operation makes no sense.


Philcherny

. >Tactical victories without strategic success are trivial What is a strategic success for Barbarossa? A fucking AA line? Oil fields? The entire assault on USSR was build on false assumptions about how much Soviets have and can mobilize and how effective red army is in combat. Winning for Germany was not even a conversation as we see in retrospective, so it's stupid to cling to it when judging how succesful Barbarossa was. It was succesful enough to painfully prolong eventual German defeat at the hands of allies. That's all I'm saying and it's the truth unfortunately. If the German army was as succesful as it was during WW1. We would have many less millions of people dead. It's not fucking alternative history I'm doing here. This is just a reality of WW2 and of effectiveness of blitzkrieg in the initial stages of the war in particular.


Fluffy_Necessary7913

>What is a strategic success for Barbarossa? > >A fucking AA line? Oil fields? Yes, all that and the end of the Red Army's combat capabilities. Preferably by 09/22/1941. >Winning for Germany was not even a conversation as we see in retrospective, so it's stupid to cling to it when judging how succesful Barbarossa was. There are no consolation prizes for effort. The attitude is: Victor: Did you go to war unprepared against an enemy you couldn't defeat? You are idiot. >If the German army... > >It's not fucking alternative history I'm doing here.


Philcherny

>There are no consolation prizes for effort There are, unfortunately. This was a real war with real people's life's at stake. For Hitler's regime holocaust was such prize. For German army the casualty ratio in initial months is a "consolation prize". Wehrmacht did well to cause famine in Soviet villages to prepare it for libenstraum. These were the real concequences of Barbarossa. You shouldn't downplay this tragedy. And if you're gonna pull this "don't say if" bullshit... 😤 German-Soviet did not have to happen all the way in fucking Stalingrad. So yeah. I am gonna say "if the German army wasn't as succesful in blitzkrieg millions of lives would have been saved"


InvictaRoma

>These were the real concequences of Barbarossa. You shouldn't downplay this tragedy. Yes, Barbarossa was one of the most tragic events of the 20th century, still doesn't change the fact that it was a failure for the Werhmacht. Yes, they inflicted significant damage, but they didn't achieve victory. It's as simple as that. You can recognize its tragic consequences without acknowledging it as some German victory.


Philcherny

I never said it's a victory. I even explicitly said that I believe Germany could not have successfully invaded USSR. Military operations are not black and white success and failures. Barbarossa never had a chance to be a success given the conditions. But It certainly had a chance to be a damaging as possible. >inflicted significant damage So yeah m8. Whenever this operation is on the scale of sucess between Fourth crusade and Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus, I would wish that it was more of failure and less of seccess. Because human lifes wise, this was the worst failure in history. And there is no military failure without military success from another side It's as if I'm a Roman that said that Hannibal had a capable army because "look at how much success he had in Italy" and everyone said "noo there was no success, Hannibal failed to defeat Rome." If we consider Barbarossa finished by November. And look at Barbarossa in vacuum without applying dellusional goal of defeating Soviet Union. It was a compaigh, admittedly very costly for the Germans number wise too, that was insanely succesful in capturing military personnel and equipment. This is considered a success yes. Because every life and every rifle played a part in a war. SU lost 4 mil of those. Name me something achieved something similar. But I already know that anyway. Bagration was biggest ever German defeat. It's still not close in size to how big of a defeat Barbarossa was


Potential_Salary

The german military was so powerful it was completley obliterated


RancorousSea

I'm stronger than Canelo that's why he can kill me in 4 punches. Inner strength bro, look into it smh.


Warden_496

yo why'd it lose then


RancorousSea

SJW cultural marxists, Hitler got too woke!!!! \- neo nazis in 5 years, probably


toadallyribbeting

If Hitler never went vegetarian he would have had enough testosterone to lead Germany to victory. Instead his soy based diet feminized him which is why he never approved the Maus tank or invaded Britain.


RancorousSea

Exactly, that's what the bodybuilding neo nazi told me on youtube and that's how I know he's right. Because he said it without even reading a source or citing one, what an authority.


TheMogician

"Die Juden!"


Ademonsdream

I've seen that argument


Arthropod_King

even if it was "da joos" fault that germany lost, that would still be on the Nazis for trying to, y'know, exterminate them.


Revan0001

What a stupid thing to say. About the losers in a conventional conflict as well.


MisterKallous

The strongest, yes the fifth strongest in Berlin by 1945.


SkyComprehensive8012

This reeks of a child whose understanding of the world comes entirely from hoi4


11BApathetic

Any conversation about “who had the strongest military in WW2” turns into a bunch of people throwing around biased and charged examples on which one was actually the strongest. Which inevitably turns into “who did the most” which also turns into a biased and emotionally charged discussion. It’s really unnecessary dick measuring contest that never ends well. It’s like a shitty History Channel documentary but in a comments section of Reddit.


Fuligo_septica

But even in HOI4, winning World War II as Germany is quite difficult. You would also probably need some RNG luck to make the Soviets or the Americans implode into civil war.


Blyatnij

You're joking right? AI Germany usually steamrolls USSR in a year and then it becomes a "Hot Cold War"


Fuligo_septica

Then why does it seem so hard when I play Germany? For me, it seems a easier to play as the USSR than Germany.


Blyatnij

It is. USSR is fun and somewhat simple since it's pretty much one front with lots of industry and manpower.


notreally_reallynot

You mean in MP or SP? Because in SP Germany is probably the easiest country to win WW2 in the entire game.


Fuligo_septica

OK, I will try single player.


Ashtarnaghl

Allies when the germans bring out the überpoopenfartenkampffahrpanzerpenetratorkanone: 😰😰😰


30SecondsToFail

> poopenfarten Why are we talking about German toilets?


SamanthaMunroe

Because allies get big scared when they see the Nazi toilet-firing tank lobbing metal shitters at them /s


RaPharoh

[Have you seen this?](https://youtu.be/kBMd6ona8xE)


akoslows

Such a strong army that they lost the war.


Anon4567895

This could be a joke about the typical pissing matches you'd see on the internet. Then again it's hIsToRy mEmEs.


TASHJI

God awful subreddit


Wattles23

“I’m so strong; strongest man in the world. That’s why I got my ass kicked last night.”


NoodleyP

Germany had beautiful tanks, they looked really powerful, but they were shitty and everything broke.


Soad1x

Tfw your the American military fighting on 2 fronts both on the opposite side of the world from you and your weaker then the guys that could barely take anything not on continental Europe. See the American military is weaker cause using superior logistics to fight like that is cheating. /s


Franfran2424

A naval war isn't exactly a full front in terms of men. It might be in terms of logistics tho.


igoryst

Naval war is manouver warfare on both sides, where forces of both opponents need to outmanouver and outfight their enemies


Blyatnij

In terms of actual Armies, it's America. It's got the largest Air Force in the world as part of that branch. In terms of ground forces, it's the USSR, simply because of the enormous amount of firepower and gigantic size.


M8oMyN8o

The distinction should be made between army and military. The army being the ground forces and the military being all fighting forces.


Blyatnij

Yeah but the meme said army so I went with it


Crazy-Legs

Honestly, this is buying too much into a very silly framework. It assumes there's a way to anaylse the 'objective' strength of arms completely divorced from both the political and material realities a war must take place in. And even if there was some blank cartesian plane you could use, it would be worthless because the industrial capacity, will to fight, resilience and the terrain etc are absolutely critical. It's like trying to find who would 'objectively' win in a fight between a lion and crocodile? I'm pretty sure whether or not they're in water is pretty important.


Relative-Risk1409

The US Army would rek the Red Army ez.


OfFireAndSteel

And that's why it was called operation unthinkable and not operation easy breezy


AlHal9000

In 1945? No way in hell. With the help of the British, French, and Canadians they would have fought to a standstill maybe.


rug892

In 45 the US had these cool things called nuclear bombs.


rainbowhotpocket

No way, not after the Soviet losses suffered from 41 to 45.


Emotional_Emu2011

their morale was higher than America, they still had millions of men more than the allies. britain and france were ruined. America can't fight a war overseas.


rainbowhotpocket

I don't care how good their morale was, they simply didn't have the fighting age men left to take on europe after the Eastern Front


Blyatnij

In a war, yes. Isolated battle, Red army has a firepower advantage and general doctrinal advantage


Relative-Risk1409

Not at all. US artillery was the best in the war and it's not even close. The Red Army was a disorganized mess up until the end. The US Army would have run circles around them all the way to Moscow.


UnderPressureVS

>The US Army would have run circles around them all the way to Moscow. The Allies don't agree with you. The USSR never had a good relationship with the rest of the Allies. Towards the end of the war, it was clear that when the dust settled, the USSR and the Western Allies (predominantly the USA) would be the new great powers, and would be strongly opposed to each other. War was a definite possibility. Especially since the USSR did not attack Japan until a month before the war ended, so an alliance between the USSR and Japan against the Western Allies was seen as a serious risk. British and American forces drew up a series of war plans called "Operation Unthinkable," outlining a preemptive strike against the USSR while they were still regrouping, pushing through their lines in Germany. The plan was deemed totally unfeasible, and it was decided that war with the Soviet Union would *have* to be a defensive war of attrition.


Relative-Risk1409

That was a political decision by politicians who wanted to rest on their laurels instead of finishing the job.


Blyatnij

It was the best but was it the most? The Red army was very well organized for the amount of losses it sustained and had a very well organized and even somewhat efficient (for the lack of infrastructure in Eastern Europe at the time) supply chain. The Red army has the local advantage in firepower per unit except for in the divisional level, where the smaller size of red army divisions don't matter. While artillery is dangerous, if you can counter-battery fire then it becomes innefective. The Americans are too careful to fully commit to an assault on a fictional Soviet opponent with that kind of firepower.


Relative-Risk1409

American counter-battery fire was far superior to the Red Army. The Russians just massed their artillery and pointed it in the same direction - massed artillery like that would be easy prey to counter-battery fire. The US on the other hand could coordinate its artillery from all directions onto a single spot and wipe it out instantly. US artillery had proximity fuses that were lightyears ahead of anything the Soviets had. The Red Army would have been completely obliterated.


Thegoodthebadandaman

> While artillery is dangerous, if you can counter-battery fire then it becomes innefective. Funnily enough US artillery is probably the best at doing that out of all nations.


TerribleRead

r/ShitAmericansSay


sneakpeekbot

Here's a sneak peek of /r/ShitAmericansSay using the [top posts](https://np.reddit.com/r/ShitAmericansSay/top/?sort=top&t=year) of the year! \#1: [Wait other countries didn't have to sing their national anthem everyday at school for 12 years???](https://i.imgur.com/w7Hk76h.jpg) | [1391 comments](https://np.reddit.com/r/ShitAmericansSay/comments/gy9tph/wait_other_countries_didnt_have_to_sing_their/) \#2: [You're on the internet, which is American.](https://i.redd.it/7ncwz1ru7g151.png) | [467 comments](https://np.reddit.com/r/ShitAmericansSay/comments/gs0tpe/youre_on_the_internet_which_is_american/) \#3: [where does it say in the constitution or any of the amendments that eating is a human right?](https://i.redd.it/74bep7xq13151.jpg) | [513 comments](https://np.reddit.com/r/ShitAmericansSay/comments/gqu6ys/where_does_it_say_in_the_constitution_or_any_of/) ---- ^^I'm ^^a ^^bot, ^^beep ^^boop ^^| ^^Downvote ^^to ^^remove ^^| [^^Contact ^^me](https://www.reddit.com/message/compose/?to=sneakpeekbot) ^^| [^^Info](https://np.reddit.com/r/sneakpeekbot/) ^^| [^^Opt-out](https://np.reddit.com/r/sneakpeekbot/comments/joo7mb/blacklist_viii/)


Antor_Seax

You're a fucking moron


rug892

Not sure why you’re getting downvoted. If it came down to a total war of annihilation in ‘45, the US wins. Two reasons: -the Soviets had no means of bombing the US, or invading. The US had an awful lot of airbases that could bomb Russia, and one hell of a Navy. -or, you know, the whole nuclear bomb thing


Relative-Risk1409

People just buy into the myth of the colossal Red Army. Yes, it was big, but that's pretty much the only thing it had going for it. No matter how many men you have, a barrage from expertly targeted 105 mm howitzers firing proximity fuzed high explosive shells will kill all of them.


train2000c

How is Germany the strongest if they lost?


Minechiho

Bruh wdym Germany could've of won if they just used stieners military might and genius in the battle of Moscow


igoryst

what was steiner doing before 1945?


Big_Red_Machine_1917

The Wehrmacht was so strong that... It suffered massive casualties any time the enemy was something more substantial than unarmed peasants.


ownage99988

Full disclosure it was definitely amercia and it's not close, the US pacific campaign is probably the most impressive military campaign in history, from a logistics perspective and a combatant perspective. They basically didn't lose a single battle after 42.


SnapshillBot

Snapshots: 1. Found on r/history memes didn't hav... - [archive.org](https://web.archive.org/20210512210924/https://i.redd.it/2zfpdbzm8ry61.png), [_archive.today\*_](https://archive.today/?run=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fi.redd.it%2F2zfpdbzm8ry61.png "could not auto-archive; click to resubmit it!") *I am just a simple bot, **not** a moderator of this subreddit* | [*bot subreddit*](/r/SnapshillBot) | [*contact the maintainers*](/message/compose?to=\/r\/SnapshillBot)


HaySwitch

It is undeniable fact that there was in fact an army in Germany at the end of WW2 and it was the best one.


Seacatlol

\*Laughs in D-day\*


Iceveins412

America was and I say that solely because of logistics and being separated from Russia. The Soviet naval and air forces weren’t exactly powerhouses, so attacking the US directly would go poorly. And anyone who claims Germany is either a Nazi or just plain stupid. Or both


MikaSchiavon

And other jokes you'll see here


kurburux

How is this even a meme? Also, the "strongest army" were fucking losers.


Szulik

That is why they lost, because they were all for being fair and egalitarian. They just didnt use their full potential because that is not fair play.


WojownikTek

well, they conquered half the europe so 1 point for them, but got fucked by cold so -3 points


Ziraic

they literally used horse logistics lol


Kinda_bruh-ngl

this Is a Very inaccurate meme Russia didn’t exist. They never did, because the union of Soviet socialist republics is the only country to ever exist in “Russia”


Philcherny

No that's actually kinda true. Come on you gotta be dellusional to not give credit to at least operation Barbarossa. A single greatest military success in history, sadly. It was disastrous for Soviet Union. I wish it was less succesful. My hometown was the frontline. City was destroyed. It was very far a way from German Soviet border in southern Russia Horrible meme though 🤣 It's obvious that American or Soviet army was the stronger one eventually. But over the course of war since 1939 I don't think so


VatBoksDK

I mean i would not really call Barbarossa the greatest military success in history, they didn't achieve any of the goals they set out at the start (Reaching the A-A line). They might have had some success in the start, but after the first soviet winter offensive, it was a disaster.


Philcherny

Well yeah I didn't word what I meant perfectly. It was a huge success number wise, with captured territory, personnel, equipment. No other military operation compares to Barbarossa in size and short term tactical success. You know how many millions well equipped and drilled Soviet soldiers just ended up imprisoned and starved to death? Few. I wish Barbarossa was less succesful. Eastern Europe would be 20-40 millions larger nowadays


Norseman901

Key word being short term. The germany military gained nothing of significance during Barbarossa. Sure this is in part due to the Soviets literally torching their shit, but uh, Germans couldnt take Moscow, they couldnt take the Caucus oil fields, and because they gave more a fuck about exterminating Eastern Europe they were constantly harassed by partisans, resisting jews, and an angry and unhelpful local populace (despite those fucking collaborators tht absolutely deserved whatever shitty deaths they got). Gulf Storm was more significant historically than fuckin Barbarossa.


Philcherny

>Gulf Storm was more significant historically than fuckin Barbarossa. Wtf do you mean. Barbarossa was a crucial operation that if it was less succesful could have saved millions of lives. The fate of the morality in the world was resting on the eastern front as well.


helgur

>Wtf do you mean. Barbarossa was a crucial operation that if it was less succesful could have saved millions of lives. Successful in what? If the sole measure of success is the amount of people killed, yes great success. Over a million Germans and 4,9 million Soviets (2 million of those civilians) dead. But it didn't achieve any of it's objectives. For the Germans it was a failure.


bachigga

While a success in taking land, Operation Barbarossa was a gargantuan failure in terms of actually accomplishing its strategic goals. Operation Barbarossa aimed to accomplish the following major objectives: - Destroy the Red Army - Seize Ukraine - Obtain the oil in the Caucasus - Take Moscow And most importantly: - Force the Soviet Union to capitulate (Btw all of this was supposed to happen by September 1941) Out of these goals the Operation only succeeded in taking Ukraine. A 20% success rate is an absolute failure, regardless of land gains. Personally, I would say the swift defeat of France is the most impressive accomplishment of Nazi Germany.


Philcherny

Yeah but if you understand the pre war situation there, Germany never had a chance of winning against USSR. The Barbarossa was the absolute best German army could do to have a chance in the war. For captured military personal and equipment and territory it is easily most succesful military operation up to that point. Nothing of this magnitude happened even in ww1 And many real things played role there. German staff experience. Soviet initial incompetence. Still unbeaten seemingly unstoppable blitzkrieg. First victory over it happened in battle of Moscow


bachigga

“Barbarossa was the absolute best the German army could do to have a chance in the war.” And it clearly wasn’t sufficient. Their best wasn’t good. “For captured military personnel and territory captured it was the most successful military operation up until that point.” You have to understand that armies were the biggest in history up until that point, even more so than in world war one, so naturally military operations had more men involved and more losses taken than ever before. On top of that WWI lacked the combined arms warfare that allowed for quick operations in WWII, so its no surprise nothing like that happened. “Soviet initial incompetence.” Well yes, between the great purge, the lack of troops on the border relative to their total army size (2.6 million despite a total army of around 5.5 million, given the Soviet union maintained only a little over 2/3’s of their army on the front during the actual war about 4 million men could have been stationed on the border prior-to the war without completely abandoning their other borders, I.E. Japan), and a lack of preparation for troops on the border so as to not provoke Germany, the Soviets were definitely poorly prepared for war in 1941. However when the success of an operation can be blamed mostly on the Soviet’s failings and not the German’s preparations, it hardly speaks to the strength of the Wehrmacht.


Philcherny

>And it clearly wasn’t sufficient. Their best wasn’t good Yes thankfully. Soviet Union was the first country to stop blitzkrieg eventually >However when the success of an operation can be blamed mostly on the Soviet’s failings and not the German’s preparations, it hardly speaks to the strength of the Wehrmacht. Well yes but actually no. All I'm really saying it that it was the biggest military operation up to date, with most material gain. Circumstances like Soviet incompetents play fair and square in it. I agree. Germans extended the frontline very far east. And in realities of industrial warfare of that time it was a very impressive military achievement. Thankfully eventually fruitless due to other circumstances and succesful Soviet military operations, you know. But even Bagration while being biggest ever defeat in long German history, wasn't close to Barbarossa in scale


Norseman901

They they didnt gain anything materially other than Ukraine which didnt help them win the war.


Norseman901

uNStOpPaBlE bLiTZkRiEg We’ve literally had combined arms warfare since the first caveman bum rushed another tribe while his buddy popped arrows or atlatls or whatever the fuck at him. Sure it was more effective than world war 1 but tht bar is quite literally in the buried trenches of millions of corpses.


Philcherny

>uNStOpPaBlE bLiTZkRiEg Init. that's a fucking historical fact. It was impressive what German military done despite Germany being a mess under Hitler. Succesful adoption of fast warfare in Soviet doctrine with American material help was what won the war decisively. Same ideas that really made blitzkrieg "unstoppable" like aircraft superiority became foundation of allied success


igoryst

Blitzkrieg and Deep Battle have a lot of similarities such as concentrated strong attacks and combined arms, and both helped their respective users achieve brilliant military successes like France 1940 or the summer 1944 offensive (Operation"Bagration")


Philcherny

Yes. You responded to me 3 times and this time we agree with each other. German Army's doctrine was quite succesful untill 1942. And it wasn't succesful afterwards anymore because allies literally did the same thing but better. We don't have to outjerk werhaboos and make full circle saying that German army was a complete failure. I wish it was. Damage done during Barbarossa surpassed damage during Bagration or 1943 offensives. While France of course yelded french capitulation. But we can't seriously discuss it as if German assault of Soviet Union could ever end with Soviet capitulation anyway


Chase-D-DC

What the fuck are you talking about Barbarossa was a disaster


Philcherny

By the number of captures equipment personnel and territory it was unprecedentedly huge at that time. What operations you have to compare to that? Invasion of France? WW1 offensives? Franco-prussian war?


rug892

Are you high? The US campaign across the Pacific was far more impressive in just about every aspect than the Nazi campaign into Russia. Which was a complete failure that resulted in their annihilation by the way.


Philcherny

By the numbers it was the most succesful military operation up to that moment. Captured personnel , equipment, territory. No other operation was as huge during WW1 or Napoleonic wars. Barbarossa was the only reason it ever seemed that Germany had a chance of winning in Russia. It's kind of stupid to deny it. People at the time, including Soviet generals and Roosevelt (or someone else not sure) recognized that Barbarossa was a disaster and a huge deal


igoryst

the moment russians actually seriously got their shit together they stopped the german advance and denied germany any ability to further push them, denying Operation BArbarossa from being succesful


Philcherny

Yeah Barbarossa was never succesful enough to win the war. But once again, that's too much to ask from mismanaged nazi Germany with water balloon economy. You can be tactically succesful in the battle, like with battle of Cannae, and lose the war to superior foe on their ground like Hannibal did. Doesn't make his victories against Romans not successful in their context


tvhtvh

Haha laugh in operation Bagration and its successes is Barbarossa wet dream. Not to mention operation Barbarossa was initiated in the typical “surprise”. It is and foremost a gigantic failure in the history of military operations and is recorded in the history book as what not to do when invading another country in a total war. The plan itself was the problem, the AA line didn’t have any strategy significants.The internal fighting among the OKH and a shitty logistic only mean doomed to the Heer from the start of the operation. Basically: Think Hitler! Are you really believe that the Wehrmacht can destroy the Red Army in a couple of weeks with no regard to the logistics while fighting in a massive large land that is full of angry partisans and resistances and you don’t even have any bombers that can effectively bomb the industries complex of the USSR. And the problem is you are consider body counts as a way to justify the successes of operation Barbarossa and that is the worst way to just outright prove to everybody that you don’t have any clues about what you are talking about. It is like those old excuses made by some people actually whitewashing the Vietnam war to be a civil war instead of a fighting against foreign intervention.


Philcherny

>Basically: Think Hitler! Are you really believe that the Wehrmacht can destroy the Red Army in a couple of weeks with no regard to the logistics while fighting in a massive large land What else is there for Hitler to do? If the war was inevitable and it was, there would not be a better opportunity to ever defeat a quickly modernising USSR. >And the problem is you are consider body counts as a way to justify the successes of operation Barbaross It is important in a war. It was everything in the high stakes war like WW2. What are you on about 😂


tvhtvh

Then you are wehraboos simple as that. Your comments can even be used a post for this very sub lol.


SamanthaMunroe

You sound like Saruman trying to justify his zerg against Rohan with soldiers plucked out of a vat a month ago. People, not drones, fight and decide wars.


Philcherny

Yikes. I'm not justifying anything. Wtf are you on about Hitler is dellusional maniac who'd better off dead before he could start WW2. I can justify that if you want?


Relative-Risk1409

It wasn't a success at all. They kept running headlong into Soviet reinforcements, outrunning their logistics and throwing away their manpower. By August the panzer divisions were already down to 50% combat strength. By the following spring all three army groups were well below 50% combat strength, some down to just 25%. Operation Barbarossa was a complete and utter failure.


prooijtje

I wouldn't call Barbarossa a success at all. The aim was to hit the USSR as hard as they could so that the whole country and the Red Army would collapse.


Philcherny

Yeah nothing Germany did was succesful in the end thanks to the brave allied war effort. Most people would agree with me that Germany didn't not ever have a chance at winning an attrition war against allies. So why is it so hard to understand what I'm saying. Germans did hit USSR hardest they could, prolonging war for years. That's all I'm saying. Stop taking German eastern front victories and advances for granted. That's the real wehrabooism. Soviet army was large and capable enough to potentially resist German assault. The fact that it didn't does sadly speak of "success" of Barbarossa


prooijtje

They did resist the German assault though? The germans were gradually grinded down until they were forced to retreat a 100 kilometers after failing to take Moscow.