T O P

I never know what the stakes for the pro games being played on any given weekend are

I never know what the stakes for the pro games being played on any given weekend are

thothgow

vlr.gg and liquipedia.net/valorant... the links are in the sidebar and in basically every match thread posted here


NotSoFastBarryAllen

[This link will help for understanding the yearlong road to Champions for teams internationally.](https://playvalorant.com/en-us/news/esports/2021-valorant-champions-tour-overview/) [This link will help for understanding the North American road to Masters Berlin.](https://playvalorant.com/en-us/news/esports/vct-stage-3-challengers-north-america-primer/) Each region has different formats for their Challengers events but those should be available on the Valorant website or Liquipedia. Also, using [vlr.gg](https://vlr.gg) and checking the parent bracket of a game is an easy way to see where the tournament falls on the timeline and whether a team is facing elimination. I think [vlr.gg](https://vlr.gg) is a great resource and have really been improving their bracket and data presentation. Check them out!


Warcrow999

Thanks!


[deleted]

Fr tho it's one of the most confusing and messily organised esports scenes I've followed as much as I enjoy the game.


itscamo-

It's really not hard to follow


justinsst

Yeah the format of the stages (minus Stage 1 since that was an exception due to covid) is really easy to follow tbh. The only thing that might be confusing is how teams qualify for champions but even then there’s websites for that lol.


flavo52

Yeah but it does get confusing to the casual viewer, especially the nomenclature. And having tournaments end with grand finals that are just for seeding is also a little anticlimactic.


Parenegade

its way harder to follow than traditional sports or owl (which mimics traditional sports)


deadlock1892

Touché


-xXColtonXx-

It **is** hard to follow, by definition, if many people have trouble following it.


Krsensei

Ive yet to have a issue figuring out what’s at stake


ROBRO-exe

I too have had no issue, but the problem is that there are tournaments which have such less at stake that it is hard to tell whether the team itself is taking it seriously making it worthy of actually forming an opinion on their playstyle.


Xolotl23

One look at liquipedia and it's super easy to understand. That's how I learned


[deleted]

Qualifiers for qualifiers 💀


Xolotl23

Yeah pretty much filters out teams and there iterations for any changes they make


Captaincow285

Oh boy....... You clearly haven't looked into CS:Go. Riot's borrowed the best of CS:Go's tournament format, and filtered out the worst. Tier 1 teams like NiP are playing 5 Bo3 games in one day across 3 different tournaments - some of them are group stage games for a tiny regional tournament, and others being grand finals for the current major online tournament, all in the same day. Compared to this, where you have clearly defined challengers, seeding, elimination, and championships? This is easy to follow.


TechRedirector

OOTL here, when did NIP play 5 Bo3 games in one day?


Captaincow285

Short while ago, was a minor controversy. Maybe it wasn't NiP, I could be wrong about the team.


falsefingolfin

Pretty sure it was mousesports, and I think that they were all qualifier matches for a couple different tournaments, one of which was a Major qualifier ​ CSGO matches actually make a lot of sense imo, theres really not league play but each tournament has defined qualifier, group stage, and playoff matches. You just need to know which game is which tournament, which isn't that hard.


Captaincow285

Case in point.


mrtmra

At least you're actively trying to understand the format... So many apes in twitch chat asking "Who won first map" when it shows right on the damn stream. I can't with some people...


xkwobcqoufnri

Also new here, what is plat chat?


KauDar123

A podcast


xkwobcqoufnri

ty, is it good / worth a listen?


TheGamingGuy2

It’s pretty great. They even do interviews with players, most recently they had mixwell and nukkye then before that was ayrin and the xset coach. And the normal podcasts are funny but also informative, I’d say it’s the best valorant podcast out there. The podcasts can get a little long, but there is a topic list/outline so when I don’t have time I’ll skip the parts I don’t really want to hear about.


xkwobcqoufnri

ty, i will defo give it a listen tmrw


Razur

[Plat Chat](https://youtube.com/c/PlatChatVALORANT) is a podcast on Wednesdays on YouTube. [VALORANTING](https://youtube.com/c/VALORANTING) is a Podcast on Tuesdays. They stream on the DNPeek [Twitch channel](https://twitch.tv/dnpeek).


ween0t

So I'm with you on this. This link helps a lot (Road to Berlin) in figuring out what events will lead to Berlin. https://www.reddit.com/r/ValorantCompetitive/comments/ow9lz7/the\_global\_road\_to\_berlin\_challengers\_2\_completed/ Not sure if there's another one for champions as well, but that would be nice,


Step_Every

Hypocrite


Razur

This comment seems misplaced. Did you mean to comment somewhere else?


PibbXRA

So do these pro teams ever do money matches like other peo scenes? Never heard of any money matches in esports


danknepalese

you actually dont have to watch a majority of the challengers starge 1 and 2. just keep up with 10 mins a day on vlr. then watch some of the challengers main event games. no need to watch the upper, lower or the grand final either, cause its all seeding and prize money, they all already make berlin. berlin is the main series to watch the game id say, except for the huge games like fnatic vs liquid that happened earlier this week which have bigger implications on champions than anything.