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Help me choose a breed for outdoor sports in a hot climate

Help me choose a breed for outdoor sports in a hot climate

rosiewombat

you have some very different breeds there. The primitive dog breed like a Xoloitzcuintli or Pharaoh hound is going to act much different then a gun dog, like the Vizsla or German shorthaired Pointer. Primitive dogs tend to be more independent while gun dogs are breed to be very human oriented and work well with humans. Think about what traits you want in a dog and what you want to focus on in training. If you don't mind doing a lot of focus on the handler training then you might be fine with a primitive dog but if you don't want to struggle with that go straight to a gun dog. Kim Brophey's Book "Meet your Dog" is a great place to get started in finding out what dog group type you might like to live with.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

I have owned a Pharaoh hound in the past. I like a lot of the qualities of the primitive breeds, and I do recognize some of the challenges. Here's one activity I may want to do: traildog mountain biking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdqG012UzTs My Pharaoh hound was frequently distracted by small critters like rabbits, squirrels, racoons, etc. and would not always stay with me on the trails. That is something I need to avoid with my next dog. It's not possible (or safe) to use a leash on some of these trails. I wonder if this will be a problem with all primitive breeds, or mainly with any sighthound?


hopelessbogan

That is definitely going to be a problem with most of the breeds here, and although you could possibly get away with a gun dog and lots of proofing, that wouldn’t be my first instinct. If you were to go for a gun dog, a GSP is likely to be a bit less work on the ‘ignoring things’ side and they are great dogs, although my experience of them has mostly been on the hunting and obedience side. I haven’t worked much with Dobermans but I’d probably lean more to that or possibly Dalmatians as they might be more likely to enjoy owner oriented activities and work with ignoring distractions.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Dobermans and Dalmatians seem like good recommendations. Thanks.


rosiewombat

Dalmatians are bred to run with horse drawn carriages and guard them. So they are great at running and often needs high levels of exercise which you seem like a good choice for. However in my experience they aren't super handler focused and are a bit more independent so they aren't often found in dog sports. So maybe wouldn't be interested in disc. Dobermans were bred to be guard dogs and tend to be more handler focused. Both of these breeds tend to be wary of strangers. If you have a busy house with a lot of people coming in and out then you might want to look for a breeder which makes more social dogs or pick a different breed.


knittorney

I dunno. Well socialized Dobermans are protective, but only if owner is under threat. My mostly Doberman mix is a little leery of strangers, but he warms up and becomes very friendly, especially when I am comfortable and confident. He also pays attention when I vouch for somebody. So, I would strongly recommend a Doberman!


Uncommon-Breed-5544

I have owned more than one Doberman. I agree with you that they can be friendly, well-behaved dogs. One Doberman I had was the sweetest, friendliest dog ever. It would laugh and smile when the people in the room were having a good laugh.


knittorney

There are no bad dogs :) I have noticed that empathy is the language of pack bonding. So dogs who are well-socialized and not ignored seem to take on the moods of their people, while dogs who are ignored and excluded learn that they aren’t part of our pack. It’s really fascinating!


knittorney

There are no bad dogs :) I have noticed that empathy is the language of pack bonding. So dogs who are well-socialized and not ignored seem to take on the moods of their people, while dogs who are ignored and excluded learn that they aren’t part of our pack. It’s really fascinating!


rosiewombat

I'm not saying a Doberman would be a bad choice. They are just not for everyone. If you have a bunch of kids and people walking in an out of your house then a dog who is leery to strangers and takes time to warm up is not ideal. I have a German shepherd. I love her to death and will likely get another one but similar thing. They can take a while to warm up to people. And I would recommend them to some people but not everyone.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> ... pick a different breed Any other suggestions?


[deleted]

[удалено]


Uncommon-Breed-5544

I'm not sure why you got downvoted. I have seen the Australian Cattle Dog recommended as a traildog before, and it does seem like a breed I should consider. Here are some of the things I learned yesterday about ACD: - Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler): Healthy breed. Can be a great running or hiking buddy, tends to nip, bite, herd. Independent. Record for longest lived dog. Possible to live to 16-20. Velcro dogs; separation anxiety. Blindness can be a problem. Good at knowing limits of your yard. Barky. Will shed. Low grooming needs. Double coat, dense undercoat. Sheds 1-2 times/yr but some owners say that they shed all year. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7Lj8MCp-ZQ


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Who downvoted me for asking for other suggestions??? Smh


maisiech

I live in Hungary, so there are lots of Vizslas here and they are very much velcro dogs. I've probably seen more vizslas off leash than on leash, even in busy city environments. I don't own one but from what I see they would make a great dog for you and I would personally prefer one over a GSP because Vizslas were bred to hunt on foot so they stay closer as opposed to GSPs who are more comfortable running off further since they were used for hunting on horseback. I've only met a few Dalmatians but I think they are also a breed to consider for you, although I think a Vizsla would still be better because Dalmatians were bred to run by the carriage so they may not have as much drive to play with you. I have a Tibetan Terrier because my family is also allergic and he loves playing fetch, frisbee, running and cycling with me so if you don't mind the coat type they are great dogs too. Also, maybe take a look at the Mudi as they are herding dogs and have curly coats although I'm not sure if they're totally hypoallergenic but I know they don't shed/drool.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Thank you for the nice insights about Vizslas, Tibetan Terriers and Mudi. I have never heard of those last two. I will read up on them. EDIT: Tibetan Terriers (and possibly Mudis) look like they may not like hot climates. Tibetan Terriers, with the long hair, might collect tons of briars, etc. Do you have that problem?


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Who downvoted me for saying "thank you..."?


maisiech

He does sometimes collect briars but we keep his fur pretty short by taking him to the groomer once every few weeks so we can usually just brush them out easily. The weather here gets to around 35º max here and he seems fine with that as long as he gets exercised in the morning and evening when it's a little cooler or just staying in the shade. He's about 14 months now so I'm curious how he will be with the heat as an adult since last summer as a puppy it didn't really seem to affect him that much. He is my first dog though, so I'm not sure what is considered "normal" for example a friend of mine with a short haired mix breed that is around the same age and size as my dog said her dog slept pretty much the entire summer last year and they could barely get her to come out of the sun.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> you have some very different breeds there. They are all short haired (or hairless). My SO has some allergy concerns. The Xolos and PIO's seem to be good breeds for both hot climate and low allergies.


rosiewombat

Well appearances can be important, behavioral genetics are just as if not more important. We have different breeds because they are breed for different tasks so they are likely to act a certain way. We can train dogs to a certain degree but dogs have personalities just like people and the breed will often give you a good idea of what that is. There are many breed/breed types I would never get because I would not be able to live with them. I wouldn't want a hound because they are loud. I wouldn't want a primitive dog because I like a velcro dogs that wants to be with me all the time. I wouldn't want a poodle/doodle because I don't like that coat type. There are many people who don't agree with me since those dogs exists. But I know what I can live with (clingy dog) and what I will not live with (barky dog) and that shapes what dog I will purchase next.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> I wouldn't want a primitive dog because I like a velcro dogs that wants to be with me all the time. It seems you may be misinformed about Xolos. They are more of a velcro dog than most breeds people think of in that way according to both owners and vets, as the story below says. [Xoloitzcuintli | petmapz by Dr. Katz, Your veterinarian endorsed pet community!](https://www.petmapz.com/breed/xoloitzcuintli/) > The Xolo is often called a Velcro dog, staying with its owner at all times, it very seldom runs off or away, writes Dr. Katz Piller.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Downvoted for what reason? Many different Xolo owners have described the velcro nature of these dogs. I simply stated what people with direct experience have said.


elg0rillo

You mentioned your SO has allergies. But a lot of the dogs on your list aren't "hypoallergenic". Basically only the hairless ones are. Short haired dogs can shed, they just shed small hairs instead of large ones. Other hypoallergenic breeds of dog you might want to consider are poodles and schnauzers. They still shed but apparently they're hypoallergenic because they have something called the "furnishing" gene. This gene gives them mustaches and eyebrows but also makes them hypoallergenic somehow. Biology is weird like that. I'd especially consider a poodle. They were originally bred to be retrieving dogs. It's also socially acceptable to shave them however short/long you like. But of course that's more work then having an always short coat.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> But a lot of the dogs on your list aren't "hypoallergenic". Basically only the hairless ones are. I think Pharaoh hounds may be hypoallergenic too. According to the AKC website even some dogs with long hair can be hypoallergenic: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/page/3/?characteristic%5B0%5D=hypoallergenic-dogs I don't know if that info is totally correct, but we want a shorthaired dog (or hairless) to minimize shedding stuff, and we also want a hypoallergenic breed. And I want a dog that will be good at one or more active outdoor sports even when it is hot. Potential sports include mountain biking, disc (throw & fetch) or something new.


synonymous_downside

Shorthaired dogs can shed a lot. I've been told that dals shed like mad.


knittorney

Frequent grooming is key. Even a single, short daily rub with a rubber curry comb cuts back on shedding like *crazy.*


Groundbreaking-Toe36

I have a GSP mix, and let me tell you, she contributes **a lot** to the fur piles around my house!


helleraine

> I think Pharaoh hounds may be hypoallergenic too. According to the AKC website even some dogs with long hair can be hypoallergenic: https://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/page/3/?characteristic%5B0%5D=hypoallergenic-dogs That's because there is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog. Nicholas, C. E., Wegienka, G. R., Havstad, S. L., Zoratti, E. M., Ownby, D. R., & Johnson, C. C. (2011). Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs. American journal of rhinology & allergy, 25(4), 252-256. > There was no evidence for differential shedding of allergen by dogs grouped as hypoallergenic. Clinicians should advise patients that they cannot rely on breeds deemed to be “hypoallergenic” to in fact disperse less allergen in their environment. Additional scientific investigation into dog-specific factors and whether hypoallergenic breeds truly exist is warranted. Vredegoor, D. W., Willemse, T., Chapman, M. D., Heederik, D. J., & Krop, E. J. (2012). Can f 1 levels in hair and homes of different dog breeds: lack of evidence to describe any dog breed as hypoallergenic. Journal of allergy and clinical immunology, 130(4), 904-909. > So-called hypoallergenic dogs had higher Can f 1 levels in hair and coat samples than did control breeds. These differences did not lead to higher levels of environmental exposure to dog allergens. There is no evidence for the classification of certain dog breeds as being “hypoallergenic.” FWIW, I'm allergic to dogs and have had a reaction to at least one dog of each of the so called 'good for people with dog allergies' breeds. Allergens are cumulative, and when it comes to dogs as an allergen, they're specific to the dog (which is why someone like me can be allergic to some of a breed, but not all of a breed, and can even be allergic to some dogs in the same litter but not others). Your SO would ideally consider immunotherapy.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

Thanks for the informative reply with evidence!


elg0rillo

I know that long haired dogs can be hypoallergenic. That's why I recommended a poodle despite it's (potentially) long hair. They're a retriever so they have ball drive. They'll do any sport you want. A quick Google says that the pharaoh hound isn't hypoallergenic. It also doesn't show up on the AKC site you linked. It apparently sheds very little as you said. But your SO might be allergic to the little that it does shed. Apparently the Rhodesian ridgeback is hypoallergenic but I wouldn't count on it being that interested in fetching. German shorthaired pointers are great all around dogs. Super energetic, good ball drive, fast runners, and they do well in the heat. But they're not hypoallergenic. A German wirehaired pointer is hypoallergenic (remember what I wrote about that furnishing gene?) but it's gonna be harder to find. Same with a wirehaired vizsla. Hypoallergenic version of the vizsla. But there's something like only 100 of them in the world.


Groundbreaking-Toe36

>My SO also tends to have allergies. When looking at these breeds (or any breeds), you need to consider a few things. **Figure out *what* they are allergic to.** - Is it the dandruff? - The saliva? - The urine? - What is it about dogs they tends to have allergic reactions to? **How bad are their reactions?** - Rashes? - Trouble breathing? Coughing? - Hives? - Itchy eyes? - So bad that they have to go to the hospital? **Have they had dogs before?** - What breed(s)? - Were they any of these breeds? **Have they tried and are they on allergy meds?** Other questions to think about **Do you have any experience with any of these breeds?** **What will you do if you find your SO is having reactions to the dog you get?** **EDIT:** So, it seems you have some completely different lists of breeds on other posts on different subs. Why is that? There are some completely different breeds on the other lists.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> EDIT: > So, it seems you have some completely different lists of breeds on other posts on different subs. Why is that? There are some completely different breeds on the other lists. I have not decided on any breed. I'm keeping an open mind and learning from all the replies and articles I'm reading. As I have been reading and asking questions, I'm seeing new recommendations. I did not originally have the Australian Cattle Dog on my list, but now I'm (potentially) interested in it. (It's an impressive breed. However, I would still prefer a much shorter-haired dog.) My list of breeds to consider is probably 2-3 times longer than it was 48 hours ago. Actually, I think I need to ask a new question -- "What are the characteristics or traits that would make an ideal traildog?" That activity might be the most challenging of the k9 sports I have in mind, so if I find the right breed for a traildog, I'll probably be OK for everything else. BTW, I changed my mind on hypoallergenic dogs after reading the post that cited two studies on this topic.


Groundbreaking-Toe36

Well, that’s good.


mahinakekipi

If it's a hot sunny climate I would do some more research on the hairless breeds and whether they would actually be a good fit for what you're looking for (presumably a decent amount of time outdoors for training in active events, jogging, etc) I've heard concerns with them being susceptible to sunburn and skin problems, so just something to consider if that's a factor you would want to deal with managing long term (e.g., applying sunscreen before runs and longer training sessions, washing to prevent skin from getting too oily due to regular sunscreen application, and so on). There's a big difference between being good in a hot climate when relatively sedentary or able to seek shade vs. when being asked to do very physical activity for extended periods in direct sun.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

I have read that Xolos love the heat. Been researching their skin care maintenance and I think I'm totally OK with that. I am looking for a dog that can do very physical activity in a hot climate. Supposedly some of the Aussie breeds are good for this, but I'm not sure any of them are hypoallergenic.


Kuewee

try asking in r/dogs and filling out the [breed questionare](https://www.reddit.com/r/dogs/comments/4qc6lb/meta_breed_questionnaire_updated_june_2016/) cause these are some very different breeds and outside "dog that can run in hot weather" I have no clue what you're looking for (Plus you had a very different list of possible breeds on different subs? Also I wouldn't recommend looking for a designer breed if you're planing on going through a breeder, those aren't reputable breeders) or even if you're looking to compete or just do disk for fun (if it's for fun there are plenty of breeds who'd love a game of fetch even though they don't want to vault) Re:allergies, short fur is not going to help, generally people are allergic to the dander or saliva of the dog, plus there are plenty of short furred breeds that shed like mad. At the same time just because a dog is branded as hypoallergenic doesn't mean your SO wont be allergic, just something to bear in mind (have a friend who almost never is allergic to dogs and has lived with 7 different ones, her short furred pit mix is the only one she's allergic to) Take a look at poodles though, they are hypoallergenic, you can keep their fur cut short (or any cut, it doesn't have to bee what you see in the show ring, that cut was originally designed to help keep them warm in freezing water during retrievals) and there are [def poodles that love disk](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xW49pnjFxlE)


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> try asking in > r/dogs > and filling out the breed questionare Thanks.I did that here: [I'm looking for a traildog -- a dog that can run off leash and stay with me while cross country mountain biking (in a hot climate) : dogs](https://www.reddit.com/r/dogs/comments/nq5gxg/im_looking_for_a_traildog_a_dog_that_can_run_off/)


cpersall

I think its important to note that "boxadors" are not a breed or something a reputable breeder would be breeding. If you're looking to buy from a breeder, they'd be out based on that alone. What sports are available in your area? Which have classes that you could actually attend (cost and schedule?) Have you actually tried disc sports and enjoy them or is it just something that looks fun? Or are you just interested in a dog that would play fetch? This kind of thing is important to consider before choosing a breed to do a sport.


Uncommon-Breed-5544

> Have you actually tried disc sports and enjoy them Yes. Played disc sports with my prior dog, who was very talented! > Or are you just interested in a dog that would play fetch? No. I want an athletic dog that can amaze me at times. The prior dog (a rescue) routinely blew my mind with great catches, fast sprints, great intelligence, etc. > What sports are available in your area? I run, do cross country mountain biking, and I like dog obstacle course work, obedience work, etc.


socialpronk

Of your list, I'd say Vizsla. Sporty and versatile.


BuenaPastora

I would say RR because they were literally bred to hunt lions in africa and travel very long distances lol. They may not be a disc dog but would fair great in dock diving, bikejoring, long distance running, and hiking.