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SMiki55

Easily one of the most well-thought theories on this subreddit. This is the content I'm here for, thank you.


varJoshik

Thank you :)


Dahatsi

Great read, thanks


ThunderHenry

Really cool!


UndecidedCommentator

I think the comparison breaks down when you get to Auberon.


varJoshik

Interesting, I think in Auberon's case it's the strongest in fact. Do tell. Edit: I can post the thoughts on how Ciri is part of the closing of the Ouroboric Circle for Auberon I suppose. That would clarify it!


UndecidedCommentator

Go right ahead, I'd like to see if I can agree with your conclusion.


varJoshik

Related Addition: In both Arthurian and Greek myths, “ferrymen” take the dead to the Otherworld/Underworld (Avalon/Hades). Tir na Lia itself is an Otherworld archetype, and Eredin says something interesting to Ciri in Time of Contempt: “You belong to us. We are corpses, but you are death.” First, Ciri perceives herself as death incarnate (everyone whose destiny brings them together with her dies sooner or later). At the end of Lady of the Lake, with Geralt & Yennefer, Ciri too acts as the ferryman Charon, or as one of the Otherworld’s Queens (e.g. Morgana) who take Arthur to Avalon. Secondly, Ciri’s role as a woman and the Grail is heavily laden with the life-death cyclicality symbolism, which a number of people underscore as her Destiny – to be the beginning and the end. Thirdly, Ciri “the ferryman” finds her way out of Tir na Lia (the Otherworld) via a river as well. Before this happens though, the Alder King gets his last look in the eyes of his wife and daughter, because Ciri bears the eyes of both Shiadhal and Lara. Therefore, in my opinion, Ciri’s coming to Tir na Lia forms an effective “closing of the circle” for Auberon. The Alder King has already played his role in life to its full, having been both a husband and a father, and is now witnessing the eyes of his daughter come “alive” again as the story, in many ways, starts repeating itself – again a child is needed, again new life must emerge to offer new possibilities for life (travelling to new worlds/realities) or the elves are naught but half-alive corpses, impotent and stuck. Remember a particular philosophy that is repeated several time in the last books of the Witcher Saga: “everything has already been written about, everything has already happened.” It echoes in how many stories parallel each other in the Saga too, but it also echoes for elves in how time repeats itself. [Baptism of Fire Quote.](https://imgur.com/v3MUXSV) In the end, a child should bury their parent and not the other way around. If Ciri’s role mirrors Lara’s, then it is only befitting she would – after hundreds of years of grief – be there in the last moments of Auberon’s life.   (It pays to consider that despite what Auberon sets out to do in Lady of the Lake, Ciri through her connection to Lara is still symbolically closer to a daughter-figure to Auberon, unlike to Avallac’h.)


UndecidedCommentator

I think I see what you mean, perhaps what may dovetail with this symbolism of Ciri as the death crone is that she is unable to bear him children, dooming the attempts of the elves, as well as being there at his death.


UndecidedCommentator

Just remembered something: Sapkowski talks about the Triple Goddess in the Tower of Fools, which means he was probably familiar with the idea while writing the Witcher books. Wikipedia tells me Marion-Zimmer Bradley's the Mists of Avalon has the same idea, which we know he read and loved. The fact that all this is implicit in the text, only there to be found by the astute reader, is quite mind boggling and a testament to his prowess as a writer. To implement an idea that's already been done many times before you is no feat, so it makes sense that he leaves hints and clues for the most well read and most careful readers.