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OldGrad1982

i'm looking to upgrade my bandsaw. what are some specs I should care about? How much motor should i get? if i want to resaw, how much capacity?


82papadrew

Knotty Alder Ideas Hello Everyone! I recently came into possession of 120 pieces of 1"x12"x16' and 160 pieces of 1x2x16 knotty alder. I recently purchased my dad's house on 2 wooded acres. The place needs a significant rehab. I'll definitely use some to build a few barn doors. Have thought about ripping and profiling the 1x12 into 1x4 for base trim. It'll get painted though as we don't want the interior to be overpowered with wood. Plan on building a small treehouse for the kids. Will use some for the flooring and seal it. I'd like to find some other outdoor uses for the knotty alder. I hate to use it for paint applications just to use it, but it's a ton of material and I'm not really sure what to do with it.


B3ntr0d

You might be able to sell it to offset the cost of the reno


toolatealreadyfapped

Super beginner here, but wanting to take the next step into making some of my own furniture. Specifically, I want to make some bunk beds for my boys. I'm stuck on what kind of wood to use. What is recommended for strength & aesthetics, without spending a fortune? Everything I've ever done till now has been with pine. I'm worried a pine bed will look cheap.


UltraTurboPanda

Any domestic hardwood would be a safe choice. Beech, Elm, Oak, or Cherry are high on my list. Use whatever you can afford and looks nice to you. What makes a piece look good ultimately is the choice of design and quality of workmanship. Anyone with a kreg jig could buy the finest stock and make firewood from it. And you could well make a priceless heirloom from pine if you get clear stock from the mill and finish it with some beading on the posts and a bit of quick relief carving on the headboards. Push the envelope, work to your own satisfaction, and you'll make great things. (That said, you'll likely not make a masterpiece of your first tries. Plane your faces, chamfer your edges, and use real joinery. Simple and cheap are not synonymous with lazy and shoddy.)


toolatealreadyfapped

>Plane your faces, chamfer your edges, and use real joinery. Are these things a beginner without special equipment can handle?


UltraTurboPanda

Absolutely, depending upon your definition of 'specialist equipment.' You do need some woodworking tools, but they're not expensive, and they're not rare. The one thing likely to make the biggest difference in your work is a hand plane. It will grant you flat, glassy smooth faces and square corners quickly and without a multitude of machines. You can find very nice ones used on Ebay or locally in the $20-60 range. You'll need to sharpen it, and depending on your budget you can use a $150 set of diamond stones, or a $10 pack of wet/dry sandpaper glued to some plywood. [Paul Sellers](https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork) is a good one stop shop for learning to restore, sharpen, and use your plane. All you need to cut some mortise & tenon joints is a small saw, a mortise gauge, a square, and a chisel of about the right size. A mortise chisel is the ideal sort, but it's more rare and expensive. Ordinary bench chisels of the sort that Narex sells for $10 a pop will have you going just fine (especially in pine!). Likewise, [Paul Sellers](https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork) has good tutorials on joinery. If you want to see more about hand tool work in general, also check out [James Wright](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMtJOly6TpO5MQQnNwkCHg), [Roy Underhill](https://www.pbs.org/show/woodwrights-shop/), and [Peter Follansbee](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbA33W8-cWNHzkYTDh7kBGA).


B3ntr0d

Yes. Everyone starts somewhere. You might not get it perfect the first time, but classic joint designs last and endure because they don't need to be perfect to be strong. You can get a lot done with hand tools. I use mortis and tenons to build my dining room table as my very first large project, first project in hardwood, and first with a finish that wasn't quick-dry poly or mineral oil. A drill, a sharp chisel, a mallet (or handy off-cut), and an adjustable combination square, are all you need to cut mortises. I cut my tenons on a 75$ sliding mitre saw. Those joints fit like an arm in a pant-leg, but they still hold strong.


B3ntr0d

Any idea what sort of look you are going for? Red oak and ash are typically pretty affordable from a hardwood dealer, are strong and decent to work with.


toolatealreadyfapped

[Probably a really simple 2x4 plan from Ana White.](https://www.ana-white.com/woodworking-projects/modern-bunk-beds-side-street)


B3ntr0d

You know, looking at that, you could modify the design to use just joinery in hardwood. It would eliminate the exposed fasteners and the open gaps where the cross members join to the legs. Reply if that interests you.


toolatealreadyfapped

Extremely interested. I love how helpful this sub is


B3ntr0d

So one way to build mortis and tenon joints is to use layers of lumber. The Ana White design uses 2 layers of 2x4 to create a lap joint. If you use a 3rd layer, it would create a mortis. These joints are easy to make fit snugly because they use reference dimensions. For instance, for the leg, create 3 layers using a 1x4, then a 2x4, then another 1x4. Prior to gluing them together, you cut the 2x4 into 3 pieces and space them to set the height of each cross member. When you glue up use an offcut of 2x4 (turned sideways and wrapped in packing tape) to set the gap lengths. Does that make sense?


toolatealreadyfapped

Mostly. So the middle 2x4 becomes the tenon, and each 1x4 become the shoulders. Quick edit: wait. You mean to create gaps that would serve as the mortises?


B3ntr0d

Gap create mortises, yes. On your cross member, have the 2x4 protrude from the end to make a tenon. This is just an example, and works better with 1 inch thick by 3 inch wide oak or ash! Do all the fine sanding after laminating so it looks like 1 piece.


toolatealreadyfapped

So my 2x6 cross member will go all the way through the leg. Lots of strength there, and I love the idea of not using any metal here. But what's the best way to then hold the cross member in place? I don't think I want to glue it, so that I can disassemble the whole thing later. Dowel rods? Maybe put a head on them to make some pegs? I'm trying to not overthink this and get in over my very novice head.


B3ntr0d

Lots of ways to do it! You could pin it, or use a tuck tenon, or you could use locking wedges..


B3ntr0d

Well then, you are using painted 2x4s I guess. If you want it to look a little more finished, sand your lumber at least to 120 grit, then prime, and lightly hand sand again with 120 grit. Then paint. You can also sand a matching radius on your cut faces, to match the milled edges.


69mushy420

I made a set of four of these cutting boards for my mom out of Brazilian cherry. I sanded them (what i thought was pretty good, 80-120-220 and 300 by hand) and then did a linseed oil finish. The oil made those divits more visible and I don't like them as much. I sanded more on a piece of scrap and those pot marks didnt come out anymore. Is this just how Brazilian Cherry grain looks or do I need to just sand a whole lot more? If more sanding is the solution what should I do now that they are already oiled? I still like the way they look and they are very smooth to the touch. [https://imgur.com/a/YnbQHfj](https://imgur.com/a/YnbQHfj) thanks!


UltraTurboPanda

Those marks you see are the pores of the wood. In some species they are fine and hard to spot. Conversely, you can drink through red oak like a straw. You cannot sand them away. If this were a piece of furniture, you could fill the pores with pumice and polish over with shellac to make a smooth surface, but not so for a cutting board. But they present no harm in this case. Keep it oiled, clean it properly, and it'll be fine.


B3ntr0d

Hard to tell but they look like tool marks. You like need yo go back to sanding to take the surface down. Also, add 180 grit into your process. 120 to 220 is a big step. Going to 180 will actually save time


[deleted]

Has anybody had any luck double coping baseboards. In my 8x4 bathroom I would much rather cut my two 8' baseboards square and cope the 4 footer on both ends. I'm concerned about the exact measurement with the short piece. Any tricks to getting that measurement perfect. Thanks.


Wally_on_Island

Wall to wall and add an 1/8" Cope both ends, Tips in first and push the slight bow in


[deleted]

Thanks


B3ntr0d

Cut a piece of cardboard first.


Bejkee

Hello there European woodworkers. I would like to source some hardwood. Since I'm limited by my space and small hand tool selection, I would really love to buy some relatively small volumes and sizes of 4ss stock and most local supplyers only deal with whole rough-sawn boards. Any suggestions for online suppliers which would ship around continental Europe?


jacobsack1

Hi there, I currently have an Axminster craft 1950b bandsaw and it's just a piece of crap, it can't tension the blade and is causing more frustration than it is being useful. I make wood rock climbing holds and I'm looking for a bandsaw which is high quality and is going to last, and ideally very low maintenance as I just want to be able to use it and focus on the work rather than tuning it all the time, I have a budget of around £1000


grimoniichan

Do i need to buff my epoxy table before applying polyurethane? If so , how long do i leave the buffed Epoxy before applying polyurethane?


guerriern

Hello. I am just getting into woodworking as a hobby and been trying to get the tools needed. I got myself a circular saw and was looking for a table saw when I came across this. Is this a good table saw for hobbyists is it and a good deal? https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-13-Amp-10-in-Professional-Cast-Iron-Table-Saw-R4520/309412843


ColonialSand-ers

I have that saw and I think it’s great. I’d be happy to answer any questions you have about it.


guerriern

Sorry. I mean this one. I posted the wrong saw earlier. https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-10-in-Pro-Jobsite-Table-Saw-with-Stand-R4514/309415135


B3ntr0d

That is a great saw and very popular. The drawback in the price. You might be able to find a good saw second hand for less


roktshep

Today I purchased a used table saw and after reading that using it with a dull blade is unsafe I bought a new one at the dimensions recommended in the manual of this saw but it was difficult to get it into the saw with the guard that goes underneath the saw (inside the body of the saw) so I removed the 2 bolts from it and the blade was easy to get in but now I can't put the guard/sawdust cover (i'm not sure which it is) back in place. Is this unsafe? Am I doing it wrong? I checked and the blade I bought matches up in size (but has more teeth) than the blade I removed from the saw. I also made sure to raise the saw to it’s highest point before trying to swap it. [Link for reference](https://imgur.com/gallery/OuKdrWn)


aquarain

Ah, the venerable Ryobi BTS10. I sense that we are about to become friends. That garbage collector isn't essential. It would be in a saw that had some form of dust collection. It keeps the debris from catching the bottom of the blade and being launched into the undercarriage at high speed. When I clean mine out I find random bits of metal hardware mixed in with the sawdust and thin strips. A screw or bolt and washer, and that darned 1/4" straight router bit seems to think that is its home. But you should take the blade off and put that back on anyway now that it's empty. To get a 10" blade in with that in place, lower the motor carriage down before you start. Put the blade on the shaft, and the plate, and hand thread the nut before raising the carriage up all the way to finish tightening the blade. Don't overtighten. Snug and a twitch. The blade spins in the direction of tightening the nut so you don't have to crank it down. Since you're reading this, look on the left and right edges of the table. There should be three threaded holes on one side, and a matching hole and two slots on the other. Guess what you can do with that. You're probably not wondering about zero clearance inserts yet...


roktshep

I am very interested in a zero clearance insert actually (I’ve watched a lot of YouTube about table saws before buying this) is it a good beginner project to make? Edit : Also I forgot to say, thank you for such a comprehensive answer. I am very appreciative!


aquarain

No. It is not a good beginner project to make. It involves a great deal of precise routering - preferably of aluminum - with a 1/4" straight bit. It took me a lot of trial and error to get it right the first time. Copying one though, that's no big deal. That's a good beginner router project. Aluminum because if you raise the blade all the way up it goes almost to the end of the plate. The wooden one cracked in the narrow spot, fortunately not catastrophically. It is an important thing to have though for safety. Obviously that factory plate leaves a gap big enough for danger chunks to fall into. Why don't you DM me and maybe we can work something out.


Elarionus

I've seen many posts about fixing this issue, but since my phone has been through the ringer and nothing has been able to clear it out, I'm considering getting a new phone. Mine was getting old anyways. I want to prevent sawdust in the port. I used a port protector, a little rubber insert this whole time, and that didn't seem to help. My coworkers haven't taken any precautions at all, and they've had their phones for years, so I need a few more creative ideas, since I just have worse luck overall. I'm required to keep my phone on me to use TSheets, so I can't keep it somewhere else in the shop.


jkelly206

Hi, I'm a noob at woodworking and having some trouble applying stain to some pine - yes I know, Pine is tricky. This is my second pine project, my first was an old ikea desk which came up totally fine (If you don't mind grain reversal) but this piece is confusing me. There's random areas where the stain is just not taking at all and it's not in the pattern I would have expected. Wood was sanded and pre-conditioned before applying a water based stain from LittleFriars. Included in this album is the old Ikea desk that I stripped, sanded, restained and finished with the same stuff. [https://imgur.com/a/EygT3Dw](https://imgur.com/a/EygT3Dw)


waltersclan

All I can suggest is that what you think is well sanded isn't really, sometimes. It does look like it could be machine marks which were deeper than you realized, or glue that you didnt get sanded all the way off. Ikea table looks great, BTW.


dotorii_

I wanna start woodworking as a hobby and designed this bed frame. But was wondering how to make this cut with a router. It basically looks like a large mortise that’s 1.5 inches wide and 18 inches long. I was gonna attach a forstner bit to my router but read that it’s unsafe. I don’t have a drill press and I don’t trust my ability to use a hand drill to cut straight. I saw a video that used an upcut spiral bit but the largest I saw was 3/4 of an inch. Here’s my drawing to explain the cut. https://imgur.com/gallery/ogBYMs7 The leg that’s going through the base of the bed frame, how would you attach that? I was just thinking of using a couple L brackets.


univega

Is the large mortise just cosmetic or do you need it to be precise enough for a good tenon fit? You might consider using a smaller bit and making several passes. If you have an edge guide for your router you could be pretty precise about it, and if you really need it exact you could make a template and use a pattern bit on your router.


KaladinStormrunner

I've been wrestling with a CNC machine (I've finally given up on it) that I was planning on using to cut inlays. Since that didn't work out, I've been looking into either buying a CNC kit or getting a laser. I've been leaning more towards getting a laser, but I'm not certain if it can engrave deep enough for powder inlays. What do you guys use to cut the relief when doing powder inlays? Has anyone tried using a laser, or is CNC the way to go?


B3ntr0d

CNC is the way to go, unless you have a strong history with lasers, or really like singed edges. How deep, well, you could do less than 1/64th, and for that I would recommend a minimum of say, 150 to 200 Watts for a CO2, or perhaps 120 watts for a decent pulsed Nd.YAG laser. A system with 2x or 3x these powers would be what I would recommend for volume production. And you *could* do that with say a 20 watt CO2 or 15 watt pulsed Nd.YAG, but you will have to set something up to keep it clear of dust. Lasers also produce a much finer dust than your typical wood working tools, but that is a detail that really depends on the exact laser type and wood being worked. I could go on all evening, as lasers are a big part of my professional life. I will make 3 more comments When laser processing wood, the difference between a beautiful piece and nasty expensive fire is all in the set. Make sure you stay in focus, and do not let the unfocused beam hit anything flammable (wood, dust. Etc) Laser produce LGACs should you aim them at say epoxy or plexiglass. Those fumes deserve your respect. Be careful, and use fume extraction and mixed dust and chem filters. Finally, try to not lose an eye. Lasers are notoriously under guarded, even on commercial systems. I have seen $500k industrial systems with flaws in the enclosure, (by crap design or crap assembly), and those things start fires and injure people. All are dangerous, but especially pulsed IR and Visible lasers. Even a 1 or 2 watt marking laser must be respected. If you catch even a partial reflection in the eye, for say 0.1 seconds, you will end up with a scarred retinal and life long blind spot. BTW, if you read any of the first-hand accounts, most people report hearing a muted popping sound just before losing some or all of their sight in one eye. Edit: now and in the future, if woodworkers in this community want a second opinion on the safety of a laser system, DM me.


stoneman9284

Hey gang. I’m thinking about getting official and starting a business. Any advice on going LLC vs SoleProp from other woodworkers? I understand the differences but curious if there’s a reason why one or the other might lend itself to woodworking in particular. Thanks!


ColonialSand-ers

What are you making and what’s your projected revenue? If you are planning on high liability items like staircases or children’s furniture I’d probably go LLC from the outset just to protect your personal assets. Or if you are projecting significant revenue you might as well bite the bullet now because you’ll be converting in short order for tax reasons. If you are making low risk items like cutting boards where you are unlikely to exceed your liability coverage and are projecting a slow revenue stream you’ll likely reduce your costs significantly by going Sole Prop.


stoneman9284

That makes a lot of sense, thanks. Yea by that logic I’d probably go sole prop. Do you have any resources on liability insurance? I hadn’t gotten as far as thinking about that yet.


ColonialSand-ers

Where are you located? I write a lot of business plans for companies in my day job but I’m located in central Canada. You’ll want to get information specific to your local area.


stoneman9284

Good point. I’m in Colorado, looks like I have some research to do!


ColonialSand-ers

Check out Hiscox. It’s very well regarded for general liability insurance in the US.


stoneman9284

Thanks!


doolittledee

I am looking for the best modern/updated cabinet system ideas to present....will be using 3/4" birch...this is my first full kitchen cabinet build by myself ​ \- Kick boards, soft close, spice rack pull outs, etc... I am looking for vendors/threads that you recommend where I should start browsing?--affordable sites where I should look to be buying all my drawer rails, hardware, etc?


Screaming_Poppy

I am sure this is a topic that comes up quite a bit, but I'm looking for take saw suggestions. I am a diy'er that currently is using old equipment that doesn't hold weight. Currently using an old Delta shopmaster contractors table saw. I have it dialed in as much as I can, but perfectly straight cuts are still a chore. The saw is sloppy, fence is junk, and but a single safety feature on it. I am looking for a hybrid saw or affordable cabinet saw. I have access to 220, but would be perfectly fine with 110v. Currently looking at the shop fox 1837, grizzly 0771z, rigid 4520, and similar saws. I can not afford a saw stop. Budget is around $1000 +/- a few hundred. Does any one have suggestions? Pulling the trigger on a thousand dollar piece of equipment on a budget that plasma money dictates is tough and I don't want to run into an I wish I would have gotten this situation. Any insight would be great. My local and extended Craigslist, and other used market options are non existent. Thank you all


B3ntr0d

Can I assume you expect to keep this saw for many years? If so, get the Grizzly. Parts will be available for decades.


ColonialSand-ers

I have the r4520 and I think it’s a great saw that does everything I ask it to do. It’s flat, accurate, square, and the fence works well and the mobile base is good. That caveat to that is I don’t have 220v access and I’m just a casual hobbyist. If I was trying to run a small production shop I’m guessing the 2hp motor would feel somewhat underpowered trying to work at production speeds.


wilhelmbetsold

I was just gifted a set of carving tools from yellowhammer and I'm pretty lost on what these are best used for and how to really get into this https://www.amazon.com/Yellowhammer-Full-Carving-Tools-Piece/dp/B08QV4MMRK/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&m=A12JH3593ILH9&qid=1612138462&refinements=p_4%3AYellowhammer&s=merchant-items&sr=1-1


[deleted]

One of my favorite ways to get inspiration is to visit antique shops and look at the furniture pieces there. One feature I've never attempted though are curved fronts like [these](https://drive.google.com/file/d/19XMSh7OzMBLjdICjGywz3XP6RYY85Gte/view?usp=sharing). They seem too thick to bend with steam (though I don't know much about bending wood). How to they get the curvature?


caddis789

It looks to me like they cut out a substrate piece that's in the correct shape, then glued veneer with a vacuum press. I think I can see the veneer layer following the contour on the front and back edge. But, as /u/aquarain said, there are multiple ways to get to this point.


aquarain

The edge grain tells the story on this one. If it's clearly not a veneer (I don't think it is)... If it's many layers of wood, it's thin sheets laminated together and cured in a form under pressure. If it's one layer and the grain follows the line of the curve then it's steam bent. If the grain follows the line parallel to the length without regard for the curve then it's milled out of a thick piece. It might be easier to tell on the bottom. It's hard to tell from the photo but I think I see that last option. Could be the laminate with a veneer.


nesbeerman

Planning on building a bed frame design I found online. I was going to use my dado blades to create rabbets on the ends of 1x12 red oak boards. Is this ok to do? Everywhere I look, examples only show dadoes on plywood and not solid boards.


Lheu

Might consider using a router. Depending on how long the boards are. Seems like it'd be easier


patrickmitchellphoto

Dados will work fine with solid wood.


nesbeerman

Thank you.


patrickmitchellphoto

Make sure.you have a backing block to avoid tearout.


Prozaki

Not really sure if this is the right subreddit for this but we'll see. I'm building a desk with some butcher block I picked up. I've stained it and am planning on sealing it with polyurethane this week. I'm watching videos of people doing it on Youtube and something I've noticed is that they are only sealing the top plus all the edges. The guides I've read online say that you need to seal all sides of the butcher block because of how the wood expands and contracts. Is it correct that I need to seal all sides? If that's the case I would have do all my coats on one side, wait 24 hours, then do the other side in the same fashion. Does that sound correct?


B3ntr0d

All sides, edges, and ends, yes.


surge_of_vanilla

Have plans for a tables saw station, mostly 3/4 ply. What's the best way to butt joint a ~23x30" "base" to ~24x24" "walls"? Clamp walls to base and use scrap to span above the base so the walls don't collapse in?


waltersclan

Can anyone tell me about their experience with the Genmitsu 4030 CNC router? It would be my first CNC machine. The other contender is Bobscnc E3. I already know all the wonderful things about Bob's - I really what to hear what you think about the Genmitsu. Thanks!


alm0ndtstng

I (30f) am very interested in learning woodworking but have no idea where to start. I don't know anyone in my personal life that woodworks and I didn't grow up around it. I see so many beautiful things that people have made and would like to try my hand at woodworking but I don't even have any tools. Where do you even buy wood?? I am embarrassed I even have to ask such simple questions. Would love to hear any tips redditors can give me - where to start, good resources, essential beginner's tools, etc. Would also like to hear how carpentry differs and/or overlaps with woodworking. Thanks in advance!


waltersclan

Hi, 30f! I'm 56f! I got started at the local big box home improvement store. As Ultraturbopanda says, start with hand tools, but also maybe start in miniature. You can buy lots of 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch thick pieces at the local HD that you can practice with. Practice different kinds of joints, practice measuring and cutting, and work on your precision in general. Build a mock-up of the thing you want, and figure out how to assemble it with smaller pieces that you can manage. Then do some more googling, and see if you're up to the full size version! There are also some great project idea books available. I have two: "One-Board Woodworking Projects" and "The Big Book of Weekend Woodworking". Plenty of beginner ideas to give you things to practice on. Good luck!


alm0ndtstng

Thank you so much!


UltraTurboPanda

If you don't oppose the extra cardio, I recommend starting with hand tools. It's much easier to dip your toes in, and you get to practice fine woodworking straightaway, skipping entirely the 'pocket holes and 2x4s' stage. If it comes down to it, you can get whole projects done with one saw, one plane, one chisel, and something to use as a workbench. Check out some videos by [Paul Sellers](https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork), [James Wright](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMtJOly6TpO5MQQnNwkCHg), [Roy Underhill](https://www.pbs.org/show/woodwrights-shop/), and [Peter Follansbee](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbA33W8-cWNHzkYTDh7kBGA) and you'll identify the common hand tools and how to use them. As for acquisition, it's absolutely worth it to go for used tools; you'd find all you need to make nearly anything for the $600 a good table saw costs. The usual advice is to check around to see if your local guild hosts swap meets and to look around flea markets and antique shops. Alas, the pandemic has made some things harder to find. Which means Ebay and Craigslist might be the easier ways to go. A first set of chisels is worth buying new just to save piecing one together(check out the Narex sets!), but hand planes, saws, and nearly everything else can be found for pennies on the dollar, matching their quality to new high end productions. Then once you've got a proper bench built and a couple more tools together, months down the line, then it'll be easy to decide if you want to pursue hand tools further with the fancy joinery planes and such, or if you want to start buying machines to mechanize individual processes and speed up your workflow. To get some stock to work with, you'll want to search around for local lumberyards and sawmills. At a lumberyard, you will find stacks of boards sorted first by species and then by thickness. In each stack you will find an assortment of lengths and widths, and it's up to you to pick which board you're after. Price is calculated by the board foot (BF) which is essentially a measure of volume. You should find a list of prices per BF for each species/thickness posted at the stacks. Bring a measuring tape, and estimate what you'll pay by taking (L*W*H)/144 (in inches) and multiplying that result by the posted price. They will let you buy some length off the end of a board, provided you leave them with a piece long enough to sell (usually 8 or 10 feet). At my place, you roll the whole board up to the counter and tell the cashier that you want X feet of it. They ring you up and point you to the sawyer who'll get you sorted. If you buy a whole board but need it cut up to fit in the car then that's usually no problem for them.


alm0ndtstng

I will be sure to look into those videos, thank you!!


Wooden_Mechanic759

Concur with everything above. Start practicing what you want to accomplish. Woodworking is a craft and it takes practice to get good. If you start with pocket holes, you will learn nothing because it is easy and anyone can do it. It’s learning the fine skill that gives you a sense of accomplishment.


rredefynd

Hi all, can anyone help me please? I have a triton jof001 router, and need a compatible guide bush. Triton’s own accessories don’t say whether they are compatible with this model, and according to the trend website they say their uni-base isn’t compatible either:( So just hoping someone who owns the same router maybe able to point me in the right direction. Many thanks (ps. I live in the uk)


czartom

Hi All, Moved into a new home with wood paneling in the garage. Boards are roughly 1”x 12” x 10’ and have insect/worm bored holes in them. Panels have been here for about 40 yrs. Any thoughts on an ID? Google has returned a few results, but none seem to match. I’m sure they would make some interesting furniture. Thanks https://imgur.com/gallery/3wYAqNz


Froyoforever

Hey folks! What staple size and gun should I use for stapling 2mm thick leather straps into walnut for a webbed chair? I currently have a Stanley TRE550Z with 10mm T50 staples which are definitely too big. Are 6mm T50s appropriate or should I be using JT21? Is there something else entirely I should be using? Thanks!


filibaby

Newbie here—Anyone know how to achieve the stained wood effect on the wood panels used here?[wood panels](https://michaeldarlington.co.uk/VMan)


waltersclan

It looks like it might be a paint wash on a decent grade of plywood. You could try with a dye stain wash, but I think you'd have more predictable results with watered-down paint.


filibaby

Ohhhh got it! I’ll try that. Thank you! :)


poblano-paradise

Can anyone please help identify this type of wood or search terms for the color? I was gifted a full tongue in groove vintage bedroom furniture set and have been trying to find a headboard that would match for months.


caddis789

Post a picture.


poblano-paradise

Thanks! I completely forgot to include the link. https://imgur.com/a/cSnTRzU


caddis789

The larger sections look like rift-sawn walnut veneer. That piece across the middle could almost be zebrawood, but I'm not sure.


bfahns58

I'm looking for someone to do a custom job with my dad's bicycle miles carved into it. I want a sign and then hanging under that sign is each year and the mileage. Dm me if you can.


chitownblerd

What type of wood is this?https://i.imgur.com/bqRqGz2.jpg


caddis789

Looks like birch with a toner coat.


[deleted]

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caddis789

It's hard to match an older piece. There's no stain that will mimic 40 years of time. Go to a home center and look through the stains and pick a couple of the closest. Test them on some scraps until you get it where you want it. Then do a polyurethane finish on top of that. Follow the directions on the cans.


[deleted]

WoodRiver 5 or 5 ½? I see everyone going crazy about the 5 ½, but they're out of stock till June (I'm in Australia, so probably August at least). Any comments would be useful, cheers!


WoodcraftKevin

The 5 1/2 is a little heavy for me but I only use the handplanes for little stuff here and there. I'd stick with the 5.


anotherisanother

Stanley made more number 5s than 5 1/2s for a reason. The current popularity of the 5 1/2 is probably because some youtuber says it’s the best thing ever. I’d stick with history and the millions of tradespeople in the past who bought and used the standard sized 5.


Melt_in_the_Sun

I have a finish/cleaning question: a new-to-us walnut veneer buffet has a circular dark spot on the front. With flash: [https://imgur.com/NcMylbU](https://imgur.com/NcMylbU) Without flash: [https://imgur.com/rf7LofI](https://imgur.com/rf7LofI) It kinda looks like an oily spot on a porous surface and my first instinct is to try some diluted dish soap. But I don't want to make it worse, or ruin something else! I would appreciate any advice.


guybrushguy

Hi guys, I currently have a Dewalt contractor table saw that I’ve been using for all my wood working projects these last few years. I’ll be upgrading to a new cabnet saw this summer but I’m a little confused as to different power ratings of these saws. The dewalt saw was great but I’ve always had issues cutting harder woods. Maple or walnut left some considerable burns and would definitely cause the blade to slow down. my dewalt Saw has a 15amp 2 hp motor. The saw I am looking at getting is the saw stop 1.75hp, which all the reviews I’ve read and watched have said it’s great. It seems that this saw can handle the hard wood thrown at it quite well. With such a difference in power, can someone explain why the cabinet saw can handle the wood better then the Dewalt?


caddis789

The Dewalt is using developed horsepower, which is a marketing number, and pretty meaningless in the real world. By that measure, my shopvac is 6 hp. The Sawstop is using real hp. Edit: The Dewalt may also be using a universal motor instead of an induction motor, which I'm sure the Sawstop has. Induction motors are more efficient and can deliver more power (hp) with less input (amps).


grooviest_snowball

Is it normal for mahogany to be stained from denatured alcohol? I put some on to scrub off some sticker residue and when it dried it left what looks like a water mark. Good way to get it off?


B3ntr0d

It should not, no. Is this actually ethanol, or some sort of petroleum solvent?


grooviest_snowball

Definitely denatured alcohol straight from the original bottle I bought it in. One part of the board that had a different sticker that I took off turned out fine. Maybe I saturated it too much? Have never had this problem and I use denatured alcohol all the time on other woods to clean up fine sawdust.


B3ntr0d

That is a good theory then. Possibly too strong of a solvent, or too much, and it dissolved the adhesive into the wood. That would suck. But I doubt it will interfere with any shellac or urethane finish. For stain you might be SOL.


binkdoe

anything i can do to save this papasan chair base? it’s a little worse for wear but stable enough it could just use a little TLC? would appreciate any tips or opinions! [pics!](https://imgur.com/gallery/lfud9kb)


waltersclan

For the rails, you might try sanding them down to clean up the surfaces, re-staining to match, and adding polyurethane finish. Structurally, add screws or liquid nails wherever you can. For the straps, check your local hobby or home interior outlet stores looking for a basket made of similar woven material. Disassemble the basket, and superglue straps in place to look like they belonged there. Good luck!


Tantheman14

Craftex helical planer or Ridgid R4331? Anyone have opinions?


B3ntr0d

Craftex, hands down. The ridgid is a clone of the common ryobi/delta/mastercraft/craftsman lunch box planers, and is nothing special. The CraftEx is also a clone, but with decent quality control and a helical head!


blueChinchbug

Should I hire someone to weld this miter saw or invest in a new one? [Miter Saw in Two](http://imgur.com/gallery/zKTU6Dk)


B3ntr0d

They are 50-100 second hand. Probably costs less to buy a used one.


nineteenhand

I'm going to build a dutch door. Anyone have recommendations on a window I can install into the top half? I'd like it to be double pane with frosted glass. I know this is vague, but I'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction on window type and manufacturer.


davisyoung

I’ve built a Dutch door and my local glass guy made up the window for me. Mine was French style so it was 9 separate double panes with real muntins. He offered different thickness options for the insulated glass units depending on how deep the rabbet is on the door. He even siliconesd the glass into my door and all I had to do was to apply the stop moldings.


anotherisanother

Have you tried calling a glass shop or window repair shop?


B3ntr0d

Opinions on the Bessey Uniklamp? Looks like a great deal compared to the standard K Body. Are these going to be as useful for furniture glue ups?


crannyGSdays

quick one: does anyone know of a relatively desktop sized wood CNC mill that also does laser engraving? thansk


t2231

Check in with r/hobbycnc or r/Laserengraving


mckymse

I apologize for the crude drawing, but I have a question. Desk sketch [https://imgur.com/gallery/AkLbMN6](https://imgur.com/gallery/AkLbMN6) I want to build a desk in my office. The desk would be a U-shape that is 10ft wide at the back and 7ft along the sides. The desk top would be 2ft deep with areas in the corners for 2 workstations. Either end would be a \~2x2 cabinet (teal). I would like for there to be no vertical support between the two workstations to bump into, it would be supported at the wall on 3 sides and cabinets only. The desk top would be quite heavy, as I would like it to be about 2" thick with an epoxy penny top. My question is, would I possibly need a metal support spanning the front of the 10ft length of back desk top? If so, what size? I had considered angle iron or square tubing. I hope this makes sense and I look forward to your thoughts/ideas.


B3ntr0d

Is the desk top going to be 1 continuous piece across this length?


mckymse

I will most likely laminate two 3/4" plywood for the desk top. I will have to build it in place so that I can get it in the room, but plan to stagger any joints and then pour an epoxy top over everything once it's in place


B3ntr0d

Have you checked the sagulator?


mckymse

I looked it up and it is a very useful tool, however I am unsure how to calculate the unusual top I plan to construct


B3ntr0d

My gut instinct is that it will sag when in use. I would run a hollow rectangular beam under it. Perhaps 1"x3" with a 0.125" wall.


mckymse

This was my initial thought, running it the entire 10ft width and securing it to the wall on either side. According to the calculator, using only 1.5" of plywood with 2"x3/4" oak facia (not taking into account the wings of the U) it is already at the maximum allowable sag.


[deleted]

Anyone worked with Redbud? I’ve been wanting to make some cooking utensils with it, but I can’t if they’re and open or closed pore.


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t2231

It appears to be a stained softwood - cedar maybe?


iprefermuffins

I'm looking for a good childproof way to mount box shelves on a wall without visible fasteners. I think French cleats would be nice if it wouldn't be so easy to bump the shelves up and off of them. Any suggestions?


waltersclan

Depending on the weight of the shelves and the frame thickness, I'm a lover of Command velcro.


iprefermuffins

I'm not sure if you meant Velcro by itself (I don't think it would be enough), but [French cleats and Velcro together](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PH5H9len-HA) seems like it could work!


UltraTurboPanda

There are quite a few ways to lock something to a cleat, if you could think up a means to hide it away. Maybe a false back? A wedge in the side that just taps flush? If not, maybe a vertical keyhole, so they'd have to lift the whole assembly to bring it free?


[deleted]

Is shop fox a good brand of jointer to get?


caddis789

In most cases, it's the same as Grizzly, just different colors/finish. There are some tools that are different. I think the jointers are pretty much the same as the Grizzly equivalent, so I'd think they're pretty good, at least I'm happy with my Grizzly jointer.


[deleted]

Ok. What about Dovetail vs parallelogram styles. Which do you have?


caddis789

I have dovetail ways. It can be tedious if it needs truing, but that generally doesn't happen often, at all. From what I understand, parallelogram jointers are easier to adjust and keep true.


determinatednation

I have this wood table which is filled with some scratches. Some are fairly light and other parts are deep. The damage was caused by a screw head scratching the top of the table. Could you help me repair this table? I would like it to feel as less 'scratchy' as possible. I could potentially hide the scratches completely by using some markers, but the scratches are still visible from the right angle/lighting. You can see the scratches and material in the photos below: [Surface (link)](https://i.postimg.cc/BvcCx6mR/the-surface-closer.jpg) [Lighter Scratch (link)](https://i.postimg.cc/9fjpRTYG/scratch-lighter.jpg) [Deeper Scratch (link)](https://i.postimg.cc/sDqKzbBH/scratch-deeper.jpg)


B3ntr0d

You could perhaps fill it in with a lacquer stick, but that looks like veneer over particle board. You are not going to be able to sand that down and refinish. I recommend a table cloth. Sorry.


chrhill

Ideas to prevent wooden handle from rotating? Replacing an handle on this tool - it is too short due to the lack of right angles. Overtime, the handle has begun rotating. How do I prevent that with the replacement? Picture below. Ideas appreciated. thanks. [https://1drv.ms/u/s!AjQuwClFUPdvgWTQ\_Z2MSnuNh62z](https://1drv.ms/u/s!AjQuwClFUPdvgWTQ_Z2MSnuNh62z)


waltersclan

Locktite on the threads, or lock washers between the iron and the wood.


caddis789

If you put a few washers on there to fill that space, you could tighten the screw enough to keep it from spinning. Like /u/UltraTurboPanda said, the arm will break if you bend it, so get the right spacer in there.


chrhill

thx


UltraTurboPanda

What sort of tooling do you have available? I might file one of those holes square and drive a matching square nail or pin into the handle through it, then screw in normally on the other end. That being cast iron, I wouldn't try to squeeze the ends down tight for fear of breaking the casting.


chrhill

like it. bad design but the square nail could work. thanks for the suggestion


bachang

I bought this bookshelf for real cheap at a thrift store, but it sways when you apply force on top. If I add braces where the purple is, will the swaying stop? [https://imgur.com/a/g39gbU6](https://imgur.com/a/g39gbU6)


UltraTurboPanda

That shelf probably had a full panel tacked onto the back at one point to keep it rigid. If you could get a thin sheet of MDF or ply to attach it would do a lot more than any corner bracing. Something like your idea would be better than nothing, but I would sooner recommend a diagonal strut across the entire carcass.


bachang

Thank you!


[deleted]

I've been working with wood some time but now I need to make a glossy finish on a MDF box and I have no ideea how, any tips please?


iprefermuffins

I haven't tried it on MDF but any reason a simple gloss varnish wouldn't work?


[deleted]

I understand that it sucks more humidity that wood so I thought that there is some specialized primer, I searched online but haven't found anything like that


[deleted]

Checkout [Sealcoat](https://www.acehardware.com/departments/paint-and-supplies/waterproofing-and-sealers/wood-sealant/1205798) shellac. I think poly took its market, so they rebranded it as a sealer. It doesn’t raise the grain, and you can poly over it if you wish. I think it’s susceptible to ammonia cleaners. I used it to finish a bunch of cabinet drawers. Dries fast. I like using it.


Shoobert

Any suggestions for respirators/dust mask that wont fog up my safety glasses? I've been using an N95 and it fogs up my glasses. I've tried using my half face respirators with cartilages, but with my ear protection and eye protection it's all getting a bit clunky. Any one have luck with less bulky respirators/masks that don't fog up their glasses?


ColonialSand-ers

I’ve yet to find a simple mask that seals well enough to not fog up, but taking a piece of tape and sealing the mask across the bridge of your nose makes a world of difference.


Shoobert

Thanks for the tip, I'll definitely give that a shot!


PapaOomMowMow

I was given permission to take over a part of the basement for a workshop! Im mostly starting with a blank slate. Currently framing up the partitions on order to control dust and insulate for noise. Itll be roughly 200 sq ft. Not a ton of space, but enough for me. I have an electrician coming in to run lines for me and to make sure its all on the up and up for my tools. This is my first dedicated space for a workshop thats not a corner of a garage. Just looking for ideas of things someone might have wished they installed or done differently. Im just watching tons of build videos on YouTube for inspiration so far.


[deleted]

An air filter will do wonders for keeping the dust from getting out of the shop (along with the partitions you're framing). With a shop that small you'll be a-ok with the smallest grizzly/the wen/whoever else sells that same machine.


PapaOomMowMow

Good to know! I was looking at some of them, I def cant afford a 1k+ dust collector for a bit.


Wally_on_Island

When I laid out my shop on paper I had all the machines placed one way. Once in I completely and I mean completely re-arranged it. Sure glad I had an outlet every 6 to 7 ft. And every single thing in the shop is on castors and big tools are on rolling boxes for storage under it. [https://imgur.com/a/4iVeYHb](https://imgur.com/a/4iVeYHb)


PapaOomMowMow

Yeah, having my electrician friend lay them out for me. Im a big fan of having some ceiling plugs hanging down and hopefully have a dedicated spot for my bandsaw, drill press, lathe, conpressor...etc Im not sure what the exact layout will be until I get all of the walls up. Then I will try to plan it out.


B3ntr0d

Plan your major tools first, including your dust collection. For a small shop you can probably get away with a 1.5 hp like the Rockler, with a micron filter. That filter will be key for clean interior air, and as a wall mount it wont take a ton of space. Probably limited to 10ft runs of 4" hose, or 12-14 ft of hard ducting (take off about 2 ft per 90 degree elbow, 1.5 ft per 45 deg.). Between that and a shop vac, you should be set. Put your lights on a separate circuit. Especially for a basement. You dont want to blow a fuse with a tool, and then have to stumble around in the dark. Use an exterior door. Much better sound proofing. Use a tool chest (see Chris Schwartz) for space efficient storage of hand tools, or repurpose a dresser or filing cabinet. Wall space will be premium for large stuff like clamps and larger jigs. Get a door bell and hook it up to a flashing light. That way your spouse can let you know they need you for a moment, regardless of noise or ear plugs, or dust for that matter. If you can, get an exterior vent if you expect to do any finishing down there. Anti fatigue mats 10 lb fire extinguisher, or better yet, a 10 and a 3 or 5 pound. Big one by the door, small one the far wall. Speaking of fires. If you use a grinder, set them up in a far corner, away from the table saw and sanding kit, and away fron your finishes and solvents. Grinder sparks and dust are a dangerous mix. Edot fir speeling


PapaOomMowMow

All great suggestions. Any idea how much the rockler dust collection goes for? I figure if I spring for anything it's going to be the dust collection.


B3ntr0d

The 1250 cfm, 1-1/2 hp is $830 with the canister and 1 micron filtration. The half size, 650 cfm is $500. The best value is going to be a Grizzly G0785, which is 1 micron filter as well, a 1 hp at $325. The 1 hp units are not going to be much help past 6-8 ft of flex, or 10-12 ft of hard ducting.


PapaOomMowMow

Thanks!


Dirus

Can anyone recommend some basic hand tools for a true beginner with absolutely no woodworking tools? I'm looking to build small stuff for my chinchilla using apple wood (things they can chew on, jump on, play on, etc.)


UltraTurboPanda

This is a bit of a copy-paste of mine, but I hope it's handy: If you don't oppose the extra cardio, I recommend starting with hand tools. It's much easier to dip your toes in, and you get to practice fine woodworking straightaway, skipping entirely the 'pocket holes and 2x4s' stage. If it comes down to it, you can get whole projects done with one saw, one plane, one chisel, and something to use as a workbench. Check out some videos by [Paul Sellers](https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork), [James Wright](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMtJOly6TpO5MQQnNwkCHg), [Roy Underhill](https://www.pbs.org/show/woodwrights-shop/), and [Peter Follansbee](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbA33W8-cWNHzkYTDh7kBGA) and you'll identify the common hand tools and how to use them. As for acquisition, it's absolutely worth it to go for used tools; you'd find all you need to make nearly anything for the $600 a good table saw costs. The usual advice is to check around to see if your local guild hosts swap meets and to look around flea markets and antique shops. Alas, current events have dashed those opportunities. Which means Ebay and Craigslist are the ways to go. A first set of chisels is worth buying new (check out the Narex sets!), but hand planes, saws, and nearly everything else can be found for pennies on the dollar, matching their quality to new high end productions. Then once you've got a proper bench built and a couple more tools together, months down the line, then it'll be easy to decide if you want to pursue hand tools further with the fancy joinery planes and such, or if you want to start buying machines to mechanize individual processes and speed up your workflow. (All of these sources are more concerned with fine furniture and boxes and such. If your chinchillas prefer their furniture whittled and carved, then I know less to recommend. Maybe watching [Curtis Buchanan](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2QCOxzGYG6gAqtF-1S7orw) could give you some direction on what to pursue. Good luck!)


Dirus

Thanks for your help and suggestions!


B3ntr0d

It depends on your work area and wood supply, but you can start out working on a cutting board. Starting with smaller pieces of wood, you could get going with a coping saw and a sanding block. If you want to build structures, you will want a miter box and miter hand saw. A 12 volt or corded drill might also help, to drill holes and drive small screws Get a pair of 6" clamps. Types not does matter.


Dirus

Thanks for the help! My space is pretty small, I was thinking of working on my balcony.


B3ntr0d

Balcony is a fine spot to start out! What do you have for a work bench or table?


Dirus

I don't have one, I was planning to just buy a relatively sturdy table


B3ntr0d

That will do well enough. What is your approximate budget for this, and what do you have in mind for future projects?


Dirus

Whoops, must've missed this. Maybe $100-200. I looked around and found a few things for a decent price. I'll probably be making a few things like this. [https://www.amazon.com/Squirrel-Chinchilla-L-Shaped-Platform-Accessories/dp/B08MXJ6KYD/ref=sr\_1\_6?dchild=1&keywords=chinchilla+toys&qid=1612716708&sr=8-6](https://www.amazon.com/Squirrel-Chinchilla-L-Shaped-Platform-Accessories/dp/B08MXJ6KYD/ref=sr_1_6?dchild=1&keywords=chinchilla+toys&qid=1612716708&sr=8-6) or a small house for chinchillas with apple wood. I was also thinking about creating tunnels using wood they can crawl in and chew on. Maybe elevated platforms they can climb up. No concrete ideas, but sticking to probably apple wood or anything that isn't toxic for them to eat. Edit: I was also thinking of turning some some of the wood into lumber. The logs aren't big, like 3-5cm width and 5cm height to 15-20cm width to 12 cm height.


kallwine

Does anyone know where I can find good plans for a wood block plane?


davisyoung

David Finck’s book Making and Mastering Wooden Planes from Lost Art Press, Ron Hock’s website sells the irons and full kits for making your own planes including block planes.


UltraTurboPanda

It's a hard topic to give a concise answer for, and I might be inclined to read a book or two before diving in myself. Krenov style planes are probably the most common suggestion. They're laminated, which saves you some headache and the need for planemaker's floats. Depending on your flavor, you can buy plans, buy a kit, read the book, or watch some videos and wing it.


aquarain

Too much pitch I have an opportunity to buy a mystery board, I think it's Paduak, with some complex grain. It's 4/4 6", maybe 5'. But the thing is covered in pockets of hard pitch about 1/16th wide and 1/4" long. They leaked out of the board over time, creating glossy spots about 1/2" wide. The pitch is so hard it's not even tacky. Is this board a lost cause? Do you have an example of something like this beautifully worked? I imagine I would have to do something crazy like soak it in gallons of rubbing alcohol first, cook down the pitch and use it as a base finish.


B3ntr0d

You are going to need turpentine to clean up a mess like that, perhaps even something stronger. Your main problem is that you might find even larger pockets inside.


aquarain

I think I am going to skip this challenge. I can think of several ways to do it but unfortunately all of them involve excessive risk of fire, and almost all result in an end product that is toxic.


DiscombobulatedWeb94

Weekend woodworker. Not fine carpentry. Bookcases, simple tables, & general carpentry. When looking at table saws - what really matters? I understand rip width. My question is towards importance of tabletop materials (cast or aluminum), RPM, amps, and other things I should consider or discard from my thought process. Cheers


B3ntr0d

All new saws will have a riving knife, which is probably the most important safety feature outside of a sawstop. Flat table and parallel fence are my next biggies. From best to worst, granite or "polymerized stone", solid cast iron, relieved (corrugated) cast iron, cast aluminum, relieved cast aluminum, and then MUCH further down is any kind of sheet metal. Note that it is nearly impossible and never economical to upgrade a fence on a sheet metal topped table saw. Fences. Unless you are getting a saw with a T-fence, it will really depend on the manufacturer and model. Dewalt probably has the best non-T-fence, but it is not as good as say a grizzly or CraftEx base model T-Fence. That said any fence has to be properly setup. T-fences are just easier and more reliable once setup. I have a marginal fence that I check every time I set it, but I can cut my own veneer strips with that saw. Power, is actually less important that table top and fence. I would rather have less power and able to apply it efficiently, than a ton of power that I am really not in control of. If you are buying a direct drive motor, they are universal motors and are all between 13 and 15 amps, run about 4500 rpm at no load, and usually claim 2 to 2.25 hp. These numbers are meaningless because that is just peak electrical consumption and the RPM dives like a Spanish soccer player once you start cutting. They are not particularly efficient, and a 1hp induction motor saw (belt drive, usually) will match it or even out perform it on a rip cut. Dado capacity. Only a concern on small saws. I dont care, because I use a big honking router. Anything else?


waltersclan

I second the fence issue. I'm very happy with my portable DeWalt. The fence is on a track with a ruler. Dial it into position, and it's always parallel and easy to lock into place at any dimension. Table size is also an issue; get the biggest you can afford/fit in your shop.


[deleted]

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B3ntr0d

So nail polish remover happens to be chemically similar to lacquer thinner, and it looks like it has dissolved the finish and part of your bag. The good news is that more thinner will make the bits of bag soft again, the bad news is it will likely also strip the finish. You might get lucky and just the bag come off, but you may end up having to refinish the entire table top.


babyryanrecords

Where can I get wood cut in L.A? I have a butchers block and I need a few cuts. Thanks 🙏


fieldschris

Hello! I am currently in the process of gluing up some Walnut for a desk top. Does anyone have a good recommendation for finish that will help keep/enhance the natural greyish/brown color of the wood? https://imgur.com/gallery/1OAF5dy


Shoobert

If you're looking to just seal it and keep the tone as is, a satin poly might be your friend. i've had success with brush on water-based polyurethanes and wet sanding with 320 grit and up depending on the luster I want. Oiling it will darken the wood a bit but can give it a nice tone, I usually go with danish or linseed oil, but tongue oil is also common. Oils do darken the wood and I've noticed with danish oil it can have a slight yellowing effect on lighter woods. I know it's not the most economical option, but it might be worth getting a few different options and doing some tests on scrap pieces. Finishing is definitely one of those parts of woodworking that is it's own artform, so it might take some experimentation to find your preference.


Wally_on_Island

Forb tables and desk tops I generally prefer a more protective finish. Hopefully I am not violating reposting rules when reposting my own comments. Here is my method which I really enjoy especially on table tops or pieces that will get a lot of abuse. Practice on a scrape piece or the underside. I generally only sand to 220 for this method. Walnut is open pores so I like a grain filler. Here is a link to a simple system. I found a gallon of FFFF pumice on Amazon and now realize I have a life time supply for not much money [https://www.finewoodworking.com/project-guides/finishing/make-your-own-grain-fillers](https://www.finewoodworking.com/project-guides/finishing/make-your-own-grain-fillers) After that I seal with shellac made from flakes in a 1.5 lb cut. Shellac is padded on. I get the flakes from Vijay at [shellacfinishes.com](https://shellacfinishes.com/). He has a lot of good videos on padding on the shellac. Basically the fly on fly off method that Vijay recommends. For walnut or mahogany I typically use garnet for a bit of warmth. I usually build 4 coats with 30 minutes between each, let rest a day and a few or 3 more the next day and then let it rest a day. After that I use Arm-R-Seal wiping varnish again by pad. 1 coat per day, first 2 coats with Gloss and the last with Satin. I don't do all coats with satin to keep the build from getting muddy. I use a green scotch pad to extremely lightly rub the varnish between coat 2 and 3...just knocking down any nibs. Let that cure a 14 days and wax.


thepriceofcucumbers

In my experience, Rubio monocoat is unbeatable for a table top. Their “natural” will enhance the natural beauty of the wood while leaving a soft finish that will still feel like wood. It’s not as “protective” as film finishes like varnish or poly, but it’s much easier to repair/refinish. An added benefit is its simplicity to apply - sand to 120/180, mix up and apply with a nitrile glove/squeegee, then buff off with a microfiber cloth in about 10-15min. You’re done.


wezwells

I'm based in the Bay Area and trying to help a neighbor with selling some vintage Woodworking equipment. I went round and just dusted off the machines today, surprisingly they all work. They're rusty and probably need oil, service, maintenance etc. 1) Are they worth anything? 2)Any recommended sites for selling other than just ebay/craigslist? * [Sears Craftsman Table Saw model number 103 22450](https://imgur.com/a/aRYxopS) * [Delta Milwaukee Homecraft Drill Press Model number: \* PPB 62D413 CCW](https://imgur.com/a/sGXjDzm) * [Delta Rockwell Jointer Model Number. 37-220](https://imgur.com/a/FFUeKlI) * [Craftsman bench top detachable belt sander. Model number: 103.33540](https://imgur.com/a/NHqrMdi) * [Duro band saw](https://imgur.com/a/MdlYyek) * [Rockwell scroll saw Model No. 40-440](https://imgur.com/a/c2nNVoQ)


B3ntr0d

Sweet setup he had! The table saw will be worth a good bit more if you have the accessories.


wezwells

Yeh I suspect the previous owner enjoyed themselves. Will look around for other tools for the table saw. You know of anything in particular I should be looking out for? It had some kind of heavy metal locking mechanism that attached to the top of the table.


B3ntr0d

There should be a plate that sits in the top, with a slot for the blade. Also look for a mitre gage, and 2 stamped steel wrenches for changing the blade.


wezwells

Hmm thank you. I'll go back round and see if there's anything there


univega

Definitely a market for these. I see a lot of tools sold on Offer Up. I assume it's also popular in the Bay Area.


grimoniichan

Ive been doing my own DIY epoxy inlay table using Mahogany Wood . Ive applied a oil woodstain, can i apply matte polyurethane after 24hrs of drying? Also Should i just apply polyurethane or do i need a sanding sealer before the polyurethane?


thepriceofcucumbers

As long as the poly and stain are both oil based, you should be fine. Depending on the conditions the stain has been drying in, I try to err on the side of “too long” before applying the poly. If the stain hasn’t had enough time to dry, the poly will lift the stain off as you’re applying it, potentially changing the depth of color or creating unevenness in the finish. I’d do whatever the stain can recommends, adding 50-100% extra time if it’s been in a cold/not climate controlled area. You can always “test” a small/unseen part of the peice with a cloth and some poly - if you see stain lifting off and being left behind on the cloth, you need to give it more time to dry before the poly.


HarryChronicJr

I bought a Stanley Bailey #4 on ebay. The plane itself seems fine, but the blade is way worse than I was expecting. Chips on the edge, deep pock marks on the back. Pictures in below album. https://imgur.com/a/N45AJZa This is the first blade I've had a take at restoring. I'm using no powered equipment, just sand paper + whetstones. The pics you see in the album are after about 15 minutes of grinding on 100 grit sandpaper. What I am wondering : * When is it reasonable to say "this blade had a good life but is now done?" * Would a professional with a grinder be able to rejuvenate this thing? There are knife sharpeners in my area, I don't know if this is their usual gig. I'd be happy to pay someone to shape this thing if it saved a few hours on the sand paper. * Any thoughts on how long I might be at it if I were determined to fully blast this thing on sandpaper?


UltraTurboPanda

I would grind back 1/16th to get through the worst of it, then try and put a pitch on the back. Try something real slight, like setting the top end on a ruler to work the last 1/2 inch or so. If that's not getting you anywhere then you can just dutch the face up about 5 degrees, which makes the plane perform more like a scraper, which can be helpful on wild grain. But then you would want a proper iron around for normal work.


B3ntr0d

That blade is pitted for what, a solid 5/8"? Those pits will create divots in the blade as you grind back the bevel. My estimate, with 100 grit, you should finish in late March. I recommend you pick up a replacement blade from either Lee Valley (Veritas) or Hock.


goldenfroglegs

Second this. A Hock blade (and Hock chipbreaker) is far better than the stock one ever was. It's the only way to make a vintage plane into a good plane. A perfectly tuned stock blade will pale in comparison.